President Trump’s conscious or unconscious decision to equate conservative ideas, policies and values with Americanism, in contrast to the Democrats’ radical socialism, may be his most enduring contribution to American political discourse. It is certain that the core ideas that the Democratic Party has now embraced have no precedent in American constitutional liberty and only Donald Trump would be unafraid to call them un-American.

With principled conservatives, such as Senator Tom Cotton and Rep. Matt Gaetz, divided over what the proper response to Iranian aggression in the Gulf of Oman and Strait of Hormuz should be – or even if any response is required – we’d like to hear what CHQ readers and friends have to say. Please use the comments section in this article to tell us what you think.

Party primary debates can make a big difference in every campaign cycle, but only if the candidates are already well known or find a unique way to present themselves. Issues always take a backseat at such “beauty contest” media sideshows. Will next week’s Democrat forums prove any different?

ConservativeHQ.com has obtained exclusive information that Oakcrest School, an independent Catholic school for girls in grades 6-12, has withdrawn from the Potomac Valley Athletic Conference (PVAC) due to the athletic conference’s decision to allow boys who “identify” as girls to compete in the conference’s girls athletic programs.

The Supreme Court on Monday lifted an order punishing a Christian baker in Oregon who refused to produce a wedding cake for a same-sex couple, telling a lower court to reconsider the dispute in light of the 2018 Masterpiece Cakeshop decision, but the SCOTUS failed to address the larger constitutional issues raised in the case. The case is No. 18-547 Klein v. Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries.

President Trump officially launches his 2020 campaign tonight. As they’ve done throughout his four-year political career, the media will feed off of the interest the event generates, then bash him relentlessly afterwards. Trump won’t care -- he and his tens of thousands of backers will have the time of their lives.

CHQ Exclusives

President Trump’s conscious or unconscious decision to equate conservative ideas, policies and values with Americanism, in contrast to the Democrats’ radical socialism, may be his most enduring contribution to American political discourse. It is certain that the core ideas that the Democratic Party has now embraced have no precedent in American constitutional liberty and only Donald Trump would be unafraid to call them un-American.

With principled conservatives, such as Senator Tom Cotton and Rep. Matt Gaetz, divided over what the proper response to Iranian aggression in the Gulf of Oman and Strait of Hormuz should be – or even if any response is required – we’d like to hear what CHQ readers and friends have to say. Please use the comments section in this article to tell us what you think.

Party primary debates can make a big difference in every campaign cycle, but only if the candidates are already well known or find a unique way to present themselves. Issues always take a backseat at such “beauty contest” media sideshows. Will next week’s Democrat forums prove any different?

ConservativeHQ.com has obtained exclusive information that Oakcrest School, an independent Catholic school for girls in grades 6-12, has withdrawn from the Potomac Valley Athletic Conference (PVAC) due to the athletic conference’s decision to allow boys who “identify” as girls to compete in the conference’s girls athletic programs.

The Supreme Court on Monday lifted an order punishing a Christian baker in Oregon who refused to produce a wedding cake for a same-sex couple, telling a lower court to reconsider the dispute in light of the 2018 Masterpiece Cakeshop decision, but the SCOTUS failed to address the larger constitutional issues raised in the case. The case is No. 18-547 Klein v. Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries.

President Trump officially launches his 2020 campaign tonight. As they’ve done throughout his four-year political career, the media will feed off of the interest the event generates, then bash him relentlessly afterwards. Trump won’t care -- he and his tens of thousands of backers will have the time of their lives.

The questions raised by Iranian attaks in the Gulf of Oman are not the small ball queries proposed by Bret Stephens, who assumes the Ayatollah’s regime must last indefinitely. The real consequential question is: Is it better for us to defeat the Islamic Republic of Iran through the economic and cultural means that brought down the Soviet Union, or is it better for us to go to war?

Laura Loomer, a former reporter for our friends at Project Veritas and Rebel Media has an uncanny ability to unsettle Far Left figures by showing up and asking the kind of incisive questions the establishment media refuses to ask. Seeing her debate her Democrat opponent during the campaign and question Democrat witnesses from the dais as a Member of Congress would inspire conservatives across the country.

With Democrats like Bernie Sanders campaigning on the necessity to spend more to provide a higher standard of living for everyone, it’s about time Americans had a conversation about the difference between “needs” and “wants.” Don’t trust a big spending politician to explain the distinction.

Rep. Mac Thornberry, one of the smartest and most sober minded national defense thinkers among the House Republicans is right, the 2001 AUMF doesn’t authorize war with the state of Iran, and President Trump shouldn’t go to war with Iran without coming to Congress – a constitutional constraint that in no way prohibits us from defending ourselves should we be attacked.

Oberlin College, long known as one the military academies for social justice warriors, just found out how expensive inciting vengeful mobs of liberals to target innocent people can be after a jury slapped the college with some $43 million in real and punitive damages for its conduct toward family business Gibson’s Bakery.

No one ethnic voting bloc will determine the outcome of next year’s election but taken as a whole, Republicans can’t afford to assume they’ll do better just because the economy is strong. Everyone wants a better life and it’s up to the political class to convince voters it will happen.

Front Page Headlines

  • Jeffrey Lord, The American Spectator

    If President Trump’s economy is still roaring along as it is today — the best economy since 1969 — the historical record would suggest a strong re-election victory. As noted over at Newsmax whether the economic variable is unemployment, GDP, wages, the stock market, gas prices, the unemployment rate for minorities, manufacturing jobs, taxes and regulations, Nasdaq, and various other issues — all collectively have produced this vibrant economy. All of which says that the polls out there today that suggest — 500 days out — that any of those top Democrats can beat President Trump — are sadly mistaken. Just as they were in 2016. And if there is any doubt? Take a look at all those Americans lining up for that Trump rally in Orlando.

  • Byron York, Washington Examiner

    Why haven't efforts to impeach President Trump gained Watergate-style momentum? The lack of energy has created a sense of bafflement and disappointment among some of the president's most determined adversaries. But there are some simple reasons for it. Here are three: 1.) The facts are different. 2). The press is different. There is far more diversity of opinion in the media writ large, and, importantly, popular access to primary sources. 3.) Congress is different. Trump-Russia could go longer still, and it would not change the basic facts of the case. It is simply a different case in a different world. Try as they might, the president's opponents can't make it 1974 again.

  • Kurt Schlichter, Townhall

    When you point out the elites' shameless dissembling, you get accused of “whataboutism,” which is apparently defined as “the outrageous act of pointing out how liberals are full of it.” But whataboutism is a moral necessity. It identifies the liars and clarifies the rules. They wouldn’t demand you stop doing it if whataboutism didn’t punch them in the gut. The days of us letting them play by one really loose set of rules and forcing us to play by another that jams us up every time we seek to pursue our own interests has passed. We’re neither suckers nor saps, and they don’t get to dictate how we defend our interests anymore. Their tsunami of hypocrisy has washed away any pretense of their moral superiority. They are why they got Trump.

  • Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

    If war comes now, it would forever be known as “Trump’s War.” One recalls: Saddam Hussein accepted war with the United States in 1991 rather than yield to Bush I’s demand that he get his army out of Kuwait. Who wants a U.S. war with Iran? Primarily the same people who goaded us into wars in Iraq, Syria, Libya, and Yemen, and who oppose every effort of Trump’s to extricate us from those wars. Should they succeed in Iran, it is hard to see how we will ever be able to extricate our country from this blood-soaked region that holds no vital strategic interest save oil. And America, thanks to fracking, is no longer dependent on the Middle East even for that.

  • Victor Davis Hanson, National Review

    Perhaps if former governor Jerry Brown knew that he would one day retire to Delano and drive the 99 daily, rather than to Grass Valley, with several state pensions in his bank account, or if Dianne Feinstein dwelled in an East Palo Alto or Redwood City residence rather than in Pacific Heights, or if all the Pelosi grandchildren had to attend state public schools, then the architects of 21st-century California might have had to live with the consequences of their own dreams and been less eager to inflict their nightmares on the other 40 million Californians. But then again, such a radical divergence between a few insider elites and a massive underclass, with little in between, is perhaps what best defines “Third World.”

  • Wesley Pruden, Washington Times

    Good ol’ Joe doesn’t have to have “a breakout moment,” but the others do. Mayor Pete might elaborate on his recent remarks that America might already have had a gay president, perhaps James Buchanan, but if so that might take away the thrill of Mayor Pete and a male inamorata in the White House. Elizabeth Warren, lately getting a respectful look, might be approaching her breakout moment. A real live Indian, if indeed Pocahontas qualifies, where Andrew Jackson once presided would be an ironic twist for the ages. There could be surprises, perhaps a big night for Amy Klobuchar. Beto is well past his sell-by date, and probably Kamala Harris, too. Everybody else looks like an also-ran already. But bring ‘em on. The suspense is killing us.

  • David Catron, The American Spectator

    The injustice of illegal aliens counting towards congressional representation in the census can’t be fixed until SCOTUS allows the citizenship question to be included in the census. The Democrats and the ACLU will prevent that if possible. They know it will shift electoral power away from states like New York and toward states like Texas. The former is hemorrhaging genuine citizens due to high taxes and cost of living. And those people are moving to… well… Texas. If the Dems can’t win Department of Commerce v. New York on the merits, they’ll try to force John Roberts to roll over. Can the Chief Justice take the pressure this time?

  • Rachel Bovard, American Greatness

    Abortion supporters like Hugh Culverhouse have long ignored the eugenic potential of abortion, just as they have ignored the sordid history of Planned Parenthood. Far from the champion of the underprivileged that it is touted to be, Planned Parenthood supports policies that would promote their diminution or elimination. Now, as states saddle the Supreme Court with increasingly strict abortion restrictions, the court will be forced to contend not only with public opinion, but also with history. As Thomas writes in his concurrence, “Given the potential for abortion to become a tool of eugenic manipulation, the Court will soon need to confront the constitutionality of laws like Indiana’s.”

  • Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

    We live in a world where, due to the pervasiveness of Big Tech, many, if not most, of us feel that our privacy is dead. Our children are growing up with that grim knowledge, unlike any generation in human history. It's not an exaggeration to imagine that this will have a profound effect on the human species itself. Big Brother is already the fabric of our existence. We need an FBI that is a defender of the people, not of itself, that is totally clean and as transparent as possible, to fight for us against this behemoth and to preserve even a semblance of what the Founders wanted for the citizens of this country. Think about that one, Christopher Wray, when you're worried about your "secrets."

  • John Fund, National Review

    FBI Lovebirds: UnderCovers is part of a genre called verbatim theater. As written by conservative filmmaker Phelim McAleer, it’s a four-person play that relies on transcripts of the secret text messages exchanged by lovers Peter Strzok and Lisa Page (the FBI agents) as well as their congressional testimony under oath. They are open to supporters sponsoring presentations in their local areas. No doubt the show will be enjoyable on computer screen, but here’s hoping that Cain and Swanson are able to put their Washington satire on the road. There’s nothing like watching great performers bring gales of laughter to an appreciative audience with their on-stage hijinks.

  • Michael Goodwin, New York Post

    In its story on her leaving, the Times was kinder than most but scolded Sanders for “breaking with decades of tradition” by canceling daily press briefings. To support their arguments, reporters quoted a former Obama press aide. That’s teamwork for you. In fact, the televised briefings became a circus because Jim Acosta and other Washington showboats hijacked them to display their contempt for Trump. The briefings are not missed except by insiders looking for a stage and an easy headline. But Sanders will be missed. She was quick on her feet and gave as good as she got. She was also smart enough not to take herself too seriously. “No one elected me to anything,” she told the Times. “They elected the president.”

  • Stephen Moore and Ann Bridges, Washington Times

    How is this for rich irony: To make renewable energy at all technologically plausible, will require massive increases in the supply of rare earth and critical minerals. Without these valuable metals, there will not be more efficient 21st century batteries for electric cars, or modern solar panels. Kiss the Green New Deal and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Bernie Sanders’ utopian vision of 100 percent renewable energy goodbye. Yet for decades now, environmentalists have erected every possible barrier to mining here in America for critical minerals — which we have in great abundance. The “keep-it-in-the-ground movement” is blocking a green future and a safer planet. Do they know this? Do they care?

  • Andrew C. McCarthy, National Review

    If President Trump does not think he should report Russian outreach to the FBI, or if the next Democratic candidate thinks it’s worth retaining foreign spies to scour the far corners of the world for dirt on Trump, voters should factor that in for what it’s worth. I daresay it will not be worth much in the greater scheme of things that cause us to vote a certain way. Whether it is 18 months from now or five and a half years from now, Donald Trump will no longer be president, but the United States will still need both to have lines of open information exchange with foreign governments and to be able to influence events in foreign countries. What is done out of spite today will be back to haunt us tomorrow.

  • Paul Kengor, The American Spectator

    For those who hoped and prayed that the scourge of black abortion would decline (with all abortions), well, too bad: the Democrats are doing their damnedest to ensure that when it comes to public funding of abortion, no child is left behind. Liberal Democrats tell us they love blacks and the poor. They are just oozing with compassion for them. So much so that they will strive to ensure that you — as a taxpayer, and regardless of your religious or conscience objections — are forced by the state to help ensure that every black or poor woman who wants to terminate her child will not be financially prohibited. Wow, what compassion. Pretty sick, folks. Pretty sick, Joe.

  • Wesley Pruden, Washington Times

    Hope springs stubbornly eternal. Bernie made a speech the other day at George Washington University and gave a full-throated endorsement of socialism as the cure for what doesn’t ail America. Eggheads, college kids and the little old ladies who pass out pamphlets at meetings of the Ethical Culture Society went all a-tingly when they heard that Bernie had gone all-out for what makes Venezuela and North Korea such tourist hotspots. Just as Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal was the answer to suffering and abuse by corporations then, so “democratic socialism” is the answer now. Some of Bernie’s Democratic opponents, who recognize folly when they see it, are rushing to get away from him, lest they become collateral damage.