While churlish Democrats are still grieving over the lost election and trying to make phony charges of Russian hacking into a special prosecutor-worthy scandal, President Trump boldly and eloquently called Americans to think about the future.

Donald Trump took his first address to a joint session of Congress and turned it into an emotional call for American unity. Plus, No need to ask – Democrats won’t help Trump; they still want to impeach him, and, Humble Trump admits he’s still growing into the job of POTUS.

President Trump's new policy toward illegal aliens, revoking President Obama’s de facto amnesty for most illegals, won 88% support, but only as a “first step” toward complete enforcement of the law.

Rather than adopt the compromising tone so beloved by Capitol Hill’s Republican swamp-dwellers, we urge the President to hold the Republican leadership's feet to the fire. Unless and until he does so he will remain limited in what he can accomplish on his ambitious agenda to make America great again.

Ever since the U.S. Supreme Court’s opinions in Heller and McDonald, many of the most liberal lower federal courts have flaunted Heller and the clear language of the Constitution and have been making up their own anti-constitutional rules restricting the Second Amendment.

Richard A. Viguerie, CHQ Chairman
It was with great interest and pleasure that I observed how this past weekend – by electing former Obama Labor Secretary Tom Perez as Chairman and runner-up Congressman Keith Ellison as Deputy Chairman – the Democratic Party officially and publicly abandoned its 85-year-old brand as the party of Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal.

CHQ Exclusives

While churlish Democrats are still grieving over the lost election and trying to make phony charges of Russian hacking into a special prosecutor-worthy scandal, President Trump boldly and eloquently called Americans to think about the future.

Donald Trump took his first address to a joint session of Congress and turned it into an emotional call for American unity. Plus, No need to ask – Democrats won’t help Trump; they still want to impeach him, and, Humble Trump admits he’s still growing into the job of POTUS.

President Trump's new policy toward illegal aliens, revoking President Obama’s de facto amnesty for most illegals, won 88% support, but only as a “first step” toward complete enforcement of the law.

Rather than adopt the compromising tone so beloved by Capitol Hill’s Republican swamp-dwellers, we urge the President to hold the Republican leadership's feet to the fire. Unless and until he does so he will remain limited in what he can accomplish on his ambitious agenda to make America great again.

Ever since the U.S. Supreme Court’s opinions in Heller and McDonald, many of the most liberal lower federal courts have flaunted Heller and the clear language of the Constitution and have been making up their own anti-constitutional rules restricting the Second Amendment.

Tonight’s Trump speech to a joint session of Congress should include specifics for the agenda ahead. Plus, George W. Bush is back on TV and proves the establishment still hasn’t learned, and, Clinton horror movie monster could be priming for a sequel in 2020.

Richard A. Viguerie, CHQ Chairman
It was with great interest and pleasure that I observed how this past weekend – by electing former Obama Labor Secretary Tom Perez as Chairman and runner-up Congressman Keith Ellison as Deputy Chairman – the Democratic Party officially and publicly abandoned its 85-year-old brand as the party of Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal.

Despite the self-promotion, the White House Correspondents Association dinner is hardly a “tradition” in the sense most Americans think of our national traditions, such as turkey for Thanksgiving dinner or fireworks on the Fourth of July.

Democrats elect a socialist as party chair, still don’t get what went wrong in 2016. Plus, Sour poll numbers likely mask the reality that is a successful Donald Trump, and, Media depicts Trump as a hapless buffoon, rings of George W. Bush.

President Trump’s team reported great beginnings for his conservative agenda to the thousands of conservatives assembled at CPAC, however, something was definitely missing.

HUD’s upward mobility programs are bound to fail because they contain no mechanism for helping people build economic success.  Rather than accept the fundamental truth that mental attitude and job opportunities are key to financial advancement, HUD always seems to conclude that financial lack is the result of discrimination.

President Trump’s address to Congress next Tuesday will call on Republicans to get busy moving the agenda. Plus, Donald Trump’s management style encourages people to express their views, and, Democrats dredge up Anita Hill to dis on Trump for being anti-woman.

Front Page Headlines

  • Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

    When the speech was over -- after there was no longer a dry eye in the house from the introduction of the widow of the Navy SEAL -- they left the room faster than fans of the losing team after the Super Bowl, only in this case they left so stunned you had to wonder if they would ever win the game again or even compete.

  • George Neumayr, The American Spectator

    By treating everything that Trump says as apocalyptic, the Democrats remind Americans that their participation in politics is pathetically restricted to denying problems, not solving them. That leaves an enormous opening for a relentlessly practical Trump to fill. As the Democrats grandstand, growing more and more preoccupied with partisan trivialities, Trump only gets more serious.

  • Charles Hurt, Washington Times

    There were so many protests on the Democratic side of the aisle, it was hard to keep track. Even the Democrats seemed confused about what they were protesting. Rep. Joseph Crowley, New York Democrat, wore an giant pin protesting, well, not sure exactly what. It simply featured a large question mark.

  • Editors, Washington Examiner

    There were several particular policies Trump embraced but which we reject, and we regret some of his omissions, such as spending restraint. But it was uplifting and a relief to see the country's new president rise to the occasion, and give a speech that was both fitting to the office and bears comparison with the orations of his predecessors.

  • L. Brent Bozell III and Tim Graham, CNS News

    Just as the media don't see their untrammeled advocacy against Trump as damaging to their brand, they don't see lurching further to the left as a problem for Democrats. In both cases, conservatives may enjoy watching them flail hopelessly inside their leftist bubble.

  • Heather Wilhelm, National Review

    If modern feminism were a person, it would be that slightly shady high-school friend who promises you epic times and a Ferris Bueller–style daytime cocktail cruise if you skip school — but when you show up, there are no cocktails, no fun of any kind, and everyone sits around complaining about the patriarchy until you all get arrested because you’re actually sitting on a stolen boat.

  • Kurt Schlichter, Townhall

    The real story was that President Trump absolutely intends on keeping his promises. Obamacare will be repealed. There will be a wall. We are deporting illegals. We are cutting taxes. The clock is ticking. Congress better understand – this guy’s patience is not unlimited. If they think they can slide back into the big talk in election years/big walks in off years mode, they are going to find Trump in their districts rallying for their primary opponents.

  • Victor Davis Hanson, National Review

    The supposedly narcissistic and self-absorbed Trump ran a campaign that addressed in undeniably sincere fashion the dilemmas of a lost hinterland. And he did so after supposedly more moral Republicans had all but written off the rubes as either politically irrelevant or beyond the hope of salvation in a globalized world. How a brutal Manhattan developer, who thrived on self-centered controversy and even scandal, proved singularly empathetic to millions of the forgotten is apparently still not fully understood.

  • George Neumayr, The American Spectator

    In a piece with the title, “These Iowans voted for Trump. Many of them are already disappointed,” readers get, if we score generously, only one quotation of clear-cut, post-election disappointment justifying the headline and that comes from a “lesser-of-two evils” Trump voter. And the Post wonders why Trump calls these stories “fake news”? If democracy dies in darkness, so does journalism, as “objective” reporters put half-baked propaganda on the front page.

  • Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

    If we believe the struggle is for “global democracy” and “human rights,” then that may put Putin on the other side. But how then can we be allies of President el-Sissi of Egypt and Erdogan of Turkey, and the kings, emirs, and sultans of Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, and Oman? But if the new world struggle is about defending ourselves and our civilization, Russia would appear to be not only a natural ally, but a more critical and powerful one than that crowd in Kiev.

  • Michael Bastasch, Daily Caller

    President Donald Trump will ask Congress to cut the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) budget 24 percent, or nearly $2 billion, according to sources familiar with the budget plans. The White House sent draft budget plans to agency heads Monday, detailing billions of dollars in cuts to a wide range of federal programs. Cuts to EPA and other agencies will fund a $54 billion increase in defense spending.

  • Editors, Washington Examiner

    Cutting federal spending is important, and Trump has pledged "big league" cuts. Sadly, there is a reason to doubt that he will do so, because most spending (63 percent last year) is on entitlement programs such as Social Security, Medicaid and Medicare, and he has made them sacrosanct.

  • Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

    If his presidency is to succeed, he must gain the cooperation of a disturbingly recalcitrant Republican Congress for his programs and this is the time to do it, to remind the skittish members what the public voted for. Soaring rhetoric, optimistic or not, the bashing of the "dishonest media," justified as that may be, and the recitation of past achievements, worthy as many may be, are all beside the point now.

  • Jeffrey Lord, The American Spectator

    Among other things, what the dust-up over President Trump’s non-appearance at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner has revealed is that presidents of the United States are used as the main attraction to fund a scholarship program that, in turn, funds young liberal journalists, the particular irony being that Republican Presidents have been essentially used to perpetuate the liberal media bias that they and their supporters so frequently complain of.

  • Paul Bedard, Washington Examiner

    Including refugees from all nations, 6,095 came in during Trump's first month. He has ordered that refugee admissions be cut from 110,000 to 50,000. The courts haven't challenged that. In the first month, 45 percent of the refugees into the United States came from the seven targeted nations, said Pew.