Rep. Kevin McCarthy is just plain too dumb and incoherent to effectively speak for the Republican minority, let alone lead Republicans to regain the majority. We urge CHQ readers and friends to sign our letter to newly elected Republicans urging them to vote for Jim Jordan for House Minority Leader and call their Republican Representative TODAY to urge him or her to vote for Jim Jordan when the House Republican Conference meets.

The Republican establishment always seems to be caught unawares when Democrats try to lawyer themselves into victory in elections that they lost on Election Day. GOP leaders always act like this is the first time they’ve seen what every conservative knows is going to happen.

The political war will rage on regardless of who Republicans choose to lead them in the next Congress. If they’re wise GOP House members will look to the recent past and discover their leaders haven’t aided their cause. New leaders would help them regain what they lost this year.

We urge CHQ readers and friends to sign our letter to newly elected Republicans urging them to vote for Jim Jordan for House Minority Leader and call their newly elected Republican Representative TODAY to urge him or her to vote for Jim Jordan when the House Republican Conference meets next week.

We have word from the White House that, perhaps as early as today, President Trump will take action to ensure asylum is not a free pass to cross our borders illegally. We applaud President Trump’s decision to use the authorities granted to him by the Immigration and Nationality Act to end the gaming of our dysfunctional immigration system.

As demonstrated by the events of this week Democrats and their media allies can’t help but whip up turmoil and foster division wherever they venture. Conservatives and Republicans must do more than look on in amazement – it’s time to get to work to ensure 2020 restores some sanity.

CHQ Exclusives

Rep. Kevin McCarthy is just plain too dumb and incoherent to effectively speak for the Republican minority, let alone lead Republicans to regain the majority. We urge CHQ readers and friends to sign our letter to newly elected Republicans urging them to vote for Jim Jordan for House Minority Leader and call their Republican Representative TODAY to urge him or her to vote for Jim Jordan when the House Republican Conference meets.

The Republican establishment always seems to be caught unawares when Democrats try to lawyer themselves into victory in elections that they lost on Election Day. GOP leaders always act like this is the first time they’ve seen what every conservative knows is going to happen.

The political war will rage on regardless of who Republicans choose to lead them in the next Congress. If they’re wise GOP House members will look to the recent past and discover their leaders haven’t aided their cause. New leaders would help them regain what they lost this year.

We urge CHQ readers and friends to sign our letter to newly elected Republicans urging them to vote for Jim Jordan for House Minority Leader and call their newly elected Republican Representative TODAY to urge him or her to vote for Jim Jordan when the House Republican Conference meets next week.

We have word from the White House that, perhaps as early as today, President Trump will take action to ensure asylum is not a free pass to cross our borders illegally. We applaud President Trump’s decision to use the authorities granted to him by the Immigration and Nationality Act to end the gaming of our dysfunctional immigration system.

As demonstrated by the events of this week Democrats and their media allies can’t help but whip up turmoil and foster division wherever they venture. Conservatives and Republicans must do more than look on in amazement – it’s time to get to work to ensure 2020 restores some sanity.

Yesterday, ConservativeHQ.com Chairman Richard A. Viguerie hosted a news conference with conservative leaders to analyze the results of the 2018 midterms and to offer a roadmap for Republicans to return to the majority in the U.S. House of Representatives.

As CHQ Chairman Richard A. Viguerie observed in his book TAKEOVER, those of us who have been around the conservative movement for many years don’t root for Republicans to lose, but we understand history well enough not to fear defeat because when the Republican establishment fails, conservatism advances.

Time will tell whether “civility” returned to American politics with the results of this year’s elections. Democrats have never shown much interest in playing nice, least of all when they’re in the majority and calling the shots. Will calmer heads prevail now? Don’t bet the farm on it.

The lesson of the 2018 midterm election for House Republicans should be clear – seat-by-seat you can look at yesterday's results and see how leadership failures cost Republican seats in the House. It is time for new conservative leadership in the House, especially now that the Party is in the minority.

In four of our six bellweather races the Republican lost. Every Republican, even the two incumbents who won, was outspent, some by more than 2 to 1. However, none of the Democrat wins were landslides indicative of a “Blue Wave" against President Trump, rather they showed a complete failure of leadership on the part of House Republicans.

Donald Trump will act like nothing’s different after all of this… but will everyone else? American politics is at best an unpredictable exercise. 2018 proved to be about what most people thought – lots of surprises and upsets… and pollsters who’re eating crow today. The next two years will be fascinating to watch.

Front Page Headlines

  • Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

    Who's responsible for this nauseating state of affairs?  The Democrats, no surprise, behave as if Boss Tweed were reincarnated in Miami Beach, bringing down their best Fusion GPS lawyer from the Perkins Coie mafia of Trump dossier fame to oversee the recount. As long as you're on the "correct" side of things, by any means necessary, right? But the GOP hasn't got clean hands either. Rick Scott and his fellow Republicans cry foul when the election supervisors of Broward and Palm Beach counties act in a manner that would make Mayor Daley blush, but aren't they a little late?

  • Larry Thornberry, The American Spectator

    OK, let’s ease off on the Flori-Duh pedal please. The somewhat inaccurate refrain heard over and over across the news-sphere over the past few days is, “Florida is having trouble counting votes again.” Wrong. Florida is not having trouble counting votes. Broward and Palm Beach counties are. And these two counties have been where the problems have popped up in cycle after cycle. Floridians have much to celebrate on Thanksgiving. But one thing we may not be able to be thankful for is that the midterm elections, long in coming and much labored, are finally over.

  • Ian Schwartz, Real Clear Politics

    Graham: Broward County is a national joke when it comes to elections, and here is where it has a lot in common with Kavanaugh. When it comes to counting votes and confirming judges, there is nothing Democrats won't do to win. They tried to destroy Brett Kavanaugh, it didn't work. They're trying to steal this election. It is not going to work.  I can't wait to get back to work and make sure we put men and women on the judiciary who actually follow the law. The law means nothing to liberal Democrats -- it is all about the outcome. They're not going to win. They didn't destroy Kavanaugh, and they're not going to screw Rick Scott

  • Wesley Pruden, Washington Times

    Newspapermen never aspire to celebrity, even the cheesy celebrity accorded by a television camera, and are willing to abide rebuke and worse, even by a president, if that’s what it takes to get the story. That’s the essential difference between a television journalist, for whom celebrity is the all and all, and the newspaperman, who knows he’s following a slightly impolite trade. He has no need of a snowflake’s safe space, where he can retreat from abuse and affront. He measures success by whether he gets the story, and if he gets it right that’s reward enough, and if a politician doesn’t like it, tough.

  • Roger Kimball, The Spectator

    The dreadful behavior of the American press — of which Jim Acosta is a poster child — is a bit like the behavior of children at a fun-fair who discover that, for the next half hour, they can hurl water balloons at their schoolmaster with impunity. The teacher, committed to help the local school raise money for a new roof, takes it in his stride. After the outing, he returns to his serious work, while the children snigger together in the corner. That’s what Jim Acosta is like. At least Don Quixote was a gentleman who endeavored to treat those he encountered with respect.

  • Andrew C. McCarthy, National Review

    The Trump administration has done a great job filling vacancies on the federal appellate courts, but there are still eleven slots open, and 111 open seats on the district courts. There is not going to be much legislating done with Democrats now controlling the House. So let’s use the time wisely. The Republican-controlled Senate, having increased its majority, must prioritize the conveyor-belt confirmation of Trump nominees. If the courts are to be prevented from dictating an ideological agenda, rather than allowing the nation to govern itself, rule-of-law judges must be installed. If not, you can elect Republican presidents to govern, but you’ll be ruled by the Lawyer Left.

  • Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

    The war in Washington will not end until the presidency of Donald Trump ends. Everyone seems to sense that now. This is a fight to the finish. A postelection truce that began with Trump congratulating House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi — "I give her a great deal of credit for what she's done and what she's accomplished" — was ancient history by nightfall. To a world watching with fascination this death struggle convulsing our capital, one wonders how attractive American democracy appears. What the Trump-establishment war is about is the soul of America, a war in which a compromise on principle can be seen as a betrayal.

  • Catharine Trauernicht, The Bull Elephant

    Virginia Republicans were represented by some very good candidates this year.  But the candidates received no support (financial or otherwise) from the Party because there was no one at the helm with resources to give them support. When we have no Party messaging around which candidates and voters can unite, no Party infrastructure capable of identifying and supporting candidates and attracting new membership, and are hobbled by sophomoric infighting, how can we win elections? So where do we go from here? I offer two suggestions.

  • Kurt Schlichter, Townhall

    No, you never win by losing, but there is opportunity for the GOP in this win. When life gives you lemons, you should take those lemons, sell them, and buy beer. While the loss of the House is annoying, Trump has options because he can play it successfully whether the Democrats make the smart move – pretending to be bipartisan – or do what they are inclined to do and act like horrible creepy fascist weirdos. Nancy Pelosi’s problem is that though she’s smart enough to see that “Everybody hug” is the smart play, her insane caucus is likely to demand the horrible creepy fascist weirdo option.

  • Byron York, Washington Examiner

    Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley clearly believes he and the committee were being jerked around. He is not happy about it. And he is determined to ensure that it not happen again. Given what happened with Kavanaugh, it seems reasonable to predict that if President Trump has another Supreme Court opening, the opposition will throw everything it has at the nominee. The Judiciary Committee is prepared to handle accusations backed by evidence. But Grassley wants to make sure everybody knows it will not take part in another circus.

  • Ben Shapiro, CNS News

    We shouldn't be surprised by last night's results. Republicans performed as they've always performed outside of Obama. Democrats performed as they've always performed outside Obama. So, what lesson should Republicans learn? That political gravity applies to President Trump — and that they've got to reach out to the suburban voters they lost in the midterms. What lesson should Democrats learn? The Republican Party remains competitive in swing states, and running to the hard progressive left while shouting about Trump won't cut it. Will either party learn those lessons? Probably not. So buckle up. It's going to be a wild two years.

  • Newt Gingrich, Fox News

    The biggest change in this election was the sheer volume of money generated by left-wing billionaires and activist groups who hate President Trump. 2018 was President Trump’s victory, and he and Sen. McConnell will use it well to continue getting judges and other nominees confirmed by the Senate, to block left-wing actions by the Democrats, and to set the stage for key legislative achievements the American people want (probably starting with infrastructure investments and reforms). The president defeated both the money wave and the liberal media – and had a very successful midterm election for a first-term president.

  • Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

    Even though the mainstream will tell you the opposite, to a great degree, Trump is better placed for a reelection than before this midterm.  A recalcitrant House, holding endless hearings no one wants to hear, will give him a useful target against which to run.  The impeachment idea -- previously stupid -- now looks ludicrous.  The big challenge for Trump will be to win the Republican suburbs that drifted away this time. (HINT: It's the economy, stupid.)

  • Andrew C. McCarthy, National Review

    Special Counsel Mueller’s investigation appears to be at a ripe stage, and if Acting Attorney General Whitaker helps steer it to a prompt conclusion, that is all to the good. Whitaker is being prejudged in some quarters as a Trump “loyalist.” That pejorative label is more a function of what the president has reportedly said that he’d like to have in an attorney general (and in other executive offices serving the president). It is not a function of anything Whitaker has actually done. Let’s see how he performs over the next few months. I’m betting he’ll do a fine job.

  • Charles Hurt, Washington Times

    Robert Francis O’Rourke — “Beto” for political purposes — narrowly lost to Senate incumbent Ted Cruz in Texas, a state Mr. Cruz should have carried by double digits. But races have a habit of narrowing when the national political media step in and dump millions and millions of dollars in free, glowing advertising for the socialist on a skateboard. Now come the endless investigations, hearings and impeachment circus in the House under Speaker Nancy Pelosi. My question is this: If that strategy did not work very well in a midterm when the Democratic base was super energized, why would it work in two years?