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Republican List of Shame On Ryan Spending Deal

Paul Ryan and Eric Cantor
Make no mistake about it, the spending deal brokered by establishment Republican Paul Ryan is a bad deal for Americans, and it represents a major betrayal of conservative principles by House Republicans who voted for it.

How bad is it?

According to Michael A. Needham, chief executive officer of Heritage Action for America, it has three major problems for conservatives:

First, it represents an immediate increase in federal spending. Under the deal, discretionary spending would rise to $1.012 trillion in 2014 and $1.014 trillion in 2015, a $63 billion total increase (though it does little to provide a real and sustained fix for President Obama's mismanagement of defense). This is a significant achievement for the president, who believes that government spending is a panacea to America's economic woes.

Second, the deal includes higher user fees on air travel and customs. But it could not be more evident that these fees are not going up to cover the cost of services; instead, they are being used to offset the aforementioned spending increases. Negotiators relied on this gimmick to make the claim they were not raising taxes, but diverting user fees to fuel bigger government is a tax.

Third, the deal relies upon promises of future cuts that the demise of the sequester vividly illustrates cannot be counted on. Proponents of the deal will argue they've achieved those significant savings over the next decade, but the promise of future savings is less valuable than savings already taking effect. As if to prove the point, negotiators moved roughly a third of the deficit reduction ($28 billion in cuts) to 2022.

We agree with Needham.

Principled conservative Representative Mick Mulvaney (SC-5) pretty well summed-up conservative objections to the spending deal in a post-vote statement saying, “…instead of using [the bill’s] modest savings to pay down our debt, this bill uses those savings to spend more money. It is difficult for me to vote for something that trades spending increases now for promised reductions in the future.  The past promised spending reductions just never seem to pan out. It’s not unreasonable to believe we are making the exact same mistake now… It seems, yet again, that Washington cannot wean itself from its spending addiction. Indeed, what we saw today is another example of how we got $17 trillion in debt:  we can have lots of bipartisanship, as long as we spend more money.”

As we said yesterday, the last time Capitol Hill Republicans abandoned the core conservative principle of fiscal restraint the voters threw them out in the elections of 2006 and 2008. For those who vote in favor of the Ryan spending deal the election of 2014 promises more of the same, with the twist that this time we won’t wait for the General Election. Conservatives will look at the Roll Call on the spending deal and start recruiting candidates to file challenges to every Republican House member who supported it.

Here’s the list of shame of Republicans who betrayed their commitment to conservative principles to embrace more federal government spending and become “Democrats-lite.”

Republicans who voted “YES” on the Ryan spending bill (Roll Call 640)

  • Aderholt
  • Amodei
  • Bachus
  • Barletta
  • Barr
  • Benishek
  • Bilirakis
  • Bishop (UT)
  • Black
  • Blackburn
  • Boehner
  • Boustany
  • Brady (TX)
  • Brooks (IN)
  • Buchanan
  • Bucshon
  • Calvert
  • Camp
  • Campbell
  • Cantor
  • Capito
  • Carter
  • Chaffetz
  • Cole
  • Collins (GA)
  • Collins (NY)
  • Conaway
  • Cook
  • Crenshaw
  • Culberson
  • Davis, Rodney
  • Denham
  • Dent
  • Diaz-Balart
  • Duffy
  • Ellmers
  • Farenthold
  • Fincher
  • Fitzpatrick
  • Fleischmann
  • Fleming
  • Flores
  • Forbes
  • Fortenberry
  • Foxx
  • Frelinghuysen
  • Gerlach
  • Gibbs
  • Gibson
  • Goodlatte
  • Granger
  • Graves (GA)
  • Graves (MO)
  • Griffin (AR)
  • Griffith (VA)
  • Grimm
  • Guthrie
  • Hanna
  • Harper
  • Hartzler
  • Hastings (WA)
  • Hensarling
  • Herrera Beutler
  • Hudson
  • Huizenga (MI)
  • Hultgren
  • Hunter
  • Hurt
  • Issa
  • Jenkins
  • Johnson (OH)
  • Joyce
  • Kelly (PA)
  • King (NY)
  • Kinzinger (IL)
  • Kline
  • LaMalfa
  • Lamborn
  • Lance
  • Lankford
  • Latham
  • Latta
  • LoBiondo
  • Lucas
  • Luetkemeyer
  • Marino
  • McAllister
  • McCarthy (CA)
  • McCaul
  • McHenry
  • McKeon
  • McMorris Rodgers
  • Meehan
  • Messer
  • Mica
  • Miller (FL)
  • Miller (MI)
  • Miller, Gary
  • Noem
  • Nunes
  • Nunnelee
  • Palazzo
  • Paulsen
  • Perry
  • Petri
  • Pittenger
  • Pitts
  • Price (GA)
  • Reed
  • Reichert
  • Renacci
  • Ribble
  • Rice (SC)
  • Rigell
  • Roby
  • Roe (TN)
  • Rogers (AL)
  • Rogers (KY)
  • Rogers (MI)
  • Rokita
  • Rooney
  • Ros-Lehtinen
  • Roskam
  • Ross
  • Rothfus
  • Royce
  • Runyan
  • Ryan (WI)
  • Schock
  • Scott, Austin
  • Sensenbrenner
  • Sessions
  • Shimkus
  • Shuster
  • Simpson
  • Smith (NJ)
  • Smith (TX)
  • Southerland
  • Stewart
  • Stivers
  • Stutzman
  • Terry
  • Thompson (PA)
  • Thornberry
  • Tiberi
  • Tipton
  • Turner
  • Upton
  • Valadao
  • Wagner
  • Walberg
  • Walden
  • Walorski
  • Westmoreland
  • Whitfield
  • Williams
  • Wilson (SC)
  • Wittman
  • Wolf
  • Womack
  • Woodall
  • Yoder
  • Yoho
  • Young (AK)
  • Young (IN)

For the complete Roll Call vote, go to this site.

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