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The U.S. Navy’s Dangerous Attrition

Our friend Frank Gaffney yesterday observed in his Secure Freedom radio broadcast that for the second time in two months, a cargo ship has taken out a U.S. Navy vessel vitally needed to project power in international waters claimed by China. 

Worse yet, said Gaffney, this is the fourth damaging incident this year involving Pacific-based warships, three of them equipped to shoot down ballistic missiles, at the very moment that North Korea is increasingly U.S. Navythreatening to fire such weapons at American territory.

A Navy officer writing under the pen name “Anna Granville” for the “Task and Purpose” website cast some light on the question we had after these incidents: Are the people getting promoted truly the best, or are they the best of who’s left?

“Granville” says the answer is both, but it is something that the Navy has been worrying about since at least 2015 when then-Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Admiral Bill Moran expressed awareness and concern that the Navy is losing people it should retain, despite maintaining the numbers it needs to meet its on-paper manpower requirements.

“Granville” noted that, as a serving officer:

I can name at least one leader, ranging in rank from E-7 to O-7, at every command I’ve been assigned to whom I admire. But for all the great leaders I tried to emulate, there were as many who toed the party line, suppressed innovation, demeaned subordinates, ignored major problems because fixing them would be too much trouble, and were more focused on personal recognition than taking care of their people and serving the United States. Often those bad leaders found ways to drown out or disempower the good ones.

“Granville” went on to observe that, “While the military understands the concept of optimal staff turnover and needs some people to get out along the way — there are only so many billets for E-7s and O-4s and up — there’s no sense of urgency at the most senior level to retain the best people. Because we’re all expendable, and there will always be more, there’s little incentive to actually monitor if good officers are leaving.”

The result, suggests “Granville,” is an environment where there is little incentive to hold the best and most talented personnel who join the Navy.

“Granville” says that these problems are, in theory, fixable, but a part of the problem that isn’t fixable is that there are some senior leaders, especially at the general/flag officer level, who seem to think, “It worked for me, it should work for them,” denying that many of them were promoted to the senior ranks not because they were the best throughout their entire career, but because they were the best of who was left after most of their peers got out.

Unspoken in “Granville’s” article are any detailed observations about the effect of eight years of politics and Obama-era social engineering projects on the military career advancement and retention environment.

Is it possible that a lot of talented people left the Navy or other branches because they didn’t like the Obama-era political environment and saw it as hostile to their values, as well as their career satisfaction and advancement?

“Granville” doesn’t say, but the implication is clear – a lot of our current officers are not necessarily the most talented people who joined the Navy prior to and during the Obama years, rather, they are the “best” of those who felt comfortable in the political and social environment Obama fostered.

The dangerous effect of this latest tragedy at sea is that because our Navy has become so small having any of our ships taken off line is worrying.

And it is especially worrying when the ship is out of service due to a major command error.

President Trump, as a businessman, understands the necessity of attracting and retaining the best talent. It is time for the White House to start asking if eight years of Obama social engineering degraded our military talent pool to the point that it is a threat to national security.

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SAILOR'S

LISTEN YOU NAVY SAILORS--- GET YOU ACT TOGETHER AND SHAPE UP. 4SHIPS DAMAGED AND THE DEATH OF SAILOR THAT DIDN'T NEED TO HAPPEN. NO MORE DO YOU HEAR ME. YOUR RESPONSIBLE FOR THAT SHIP AND CREW DAY AND NIGHT. THAT MEANS NO SLEEPING ON DUTY OR WHAT EVER ELSE IS CAUSING THESE ACCIDENTS. I DON'T CARE IF YOU HAVE TO DRINK A GALLON OF COFFEE WHEN YOUR ON DUTY.

Navy Collisions

As an old Military Intelligence Agent, I learned quickly that there are No coincidences. It is an old trick to have civilian ships, paid for in this case by North Korea, to ram our destroyers, put them out of commission and have no fear of Retaliation. So our strength in the western Pacific is reduced, our sailors are killed/injured and there is seemingly nothing that can be done. I am surprised that Naval Intelligence hasn't read their history books. We should interrogate the hell out of those ship captains and the crewmen at the helm. Water Boarding is justified in this case. Of course you'll see guilty parties commit suicide or be killed by NORK agents. Come on Navy, get you act together. But I'm afraid that the guilty crewman are already dead or gone.