Crimea

America Should Put Security First and Tell Ukraine No to Joining NATO

NATO should add nations only if they increase the security of the whole. Since U.S. would do most of the heavy lifting in any conflict with nuclear-armed Russia, the critical question for Washington is whether adding a new member would increase Americans’ security.

Trump and Putin Finally Meet: Is Reconciliation in the Air?

Washington needs to restore a working relationship with Moscow on multiple issues. That doesn’t mean trusting Vladimir Putin. It does mean making policy in accord with the way the world is, not the way we wish it was.

Who Fears Russia? Not the Europeans!

Last year NATO Europe devoted an estimated $265 billion to defense, almost four times Moscow’s expenditures of $68 billion. The Russian Republic is not the Soviet Union reborn.

Time for a European Nuclear Deterrent?

There is no evidence that the Putin government intends to start an aggressive war against Europe, and no alliance member, including the Baltic States and Poland, has boosted military outlays as if it believed conflict was imminent. Rather, the Europeans have concentrated on demanding that America do more.

Washington Should Not Risk War Over Ukraine

For most of its history the U.S. avoided what George Washington termed “entangling alliances.”  The Russian invasion of Crimea has triggered a cascade of demands for NATO, mostly meaning America, to act.  Americans should sympathize with the Ukrainian people, who have been victimized by Moscow.  But that does not warrant extending military support or security guarantees to Kiev.  

Russia vs. Ukraine: The Tragic Perils of Nationalism

From America’s standpoint, whose flag flies over Crimea today is irrelevant. But the revival of nationalism backed by military intervention sets an ominous precedent.

Is the U.S. Ready to Engage in More Warfare?

Patrick J. Buchanan, Buchanan.org

If we severely sanction Russia, she could cut off oil and gas to Europe, cause a recession in the eurozone, and move closer to China. What our Greatest Generation presidents accomplished, our Baby Boomer presidents appear to have booted away.

Is Putin the Irrational One?

Patrick J. Buchanan, Buchanan.org

America and Russia are on a collision course today over a matter – whose flag will fly over what parts of Ukraine – no Cold War president, from Truman to Reagan, would have considered any of our business.

Most Oppose Becoming Too Involved in Ukraine

Mario Trujillo, The Hill

A new Pew Research poll found 56% of people say the U.S. should not get too involved after Russian forces took over the Crimean Peninsula in Ukraine. Another 29% think the U.S. needs to take a firm stand.

Blaming Putin on Conservatives

Aaron Goldstein, American Spectator

This liberal trio thinks conservatives actually love Putin.

Ukraine: Time for Europeans To Take Over Europe’s Defense

Putin is wrong, dangerously wrong.  But how to punish Moscow?  America’s direct stake in the controversy between Russia and Ukraine is essentially nil.

Obama and Putin On The Phone

Obama told former Russian President Dmitry Medvedev to tell Vladimir Putin he'd have more flexibility after the 2012 election, but the Ukrainians had no idea just how flexible Obama could be. 

Is Putin's Invasion of Ukraine All About Oil?

The oil and gas producing region of the Dnieper-Donets basin in Ukraine happens to coincide with the eastern region of the country that has a substantial Russian-speaking population. If the central government of Ukraine uses force against the Russian-speaking protesters occupying government buildings there Putin will have the excuse he needs to gain control of one of the few major oil producing areas of Europe not already inside Russia’s borders.

Finding a Way Back From the Brink in Ukraine

The only thing worse than a completely unnecessary conflict in Ukraine would be a completely unnecessary conflict involving America. Even in the worst case the U.S. has no cause for military intervention.  Who controls the Crimea ain’t worth a possible nuclear confrontation.

Sarah Palin Was Right About Ukraine

Brad Knickerbocker, Christian Science Monitor

Back in 2008, Sarah Palin predicted that Russia might invade Ukraine, as it had Georgia, if Barack Obama became president. She's gone on Facebook to remind her critics that she was right.

Putin Learns from Hitler and History: Obama Blusters

Vladimir Putin knows his history, and he heard loud and clear the message in Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel’s statement that, “we are entering an era where American dominance on the seas, in the skies, and in space can no longer be taken for granted.”