Donald Trump

Robert Mueller has already destroyed his own legacy

Patricia McCarthy, American Thinker

Judas sold his soul for thirty pieces of silver. Mueller, it would seem, has sold his for...what? The untold millions he and his pals will rake in at taxpayer expense? The chance to take down an anti-establishment president no one expected to win? Does a man with Mueller's past service risk his legacy to achieve glory among those who inhabit his insulated bubble? Apparently so.

Outsiders vs. Insiders: Are conservatives and the GOP better off today than we were before Trump?

The most important factor in the “Are we better off?” equation is the new attitude Trump brought to the GOP and to government. The stagnation that’s plagued Washington for decades has been broken by Trump’s insistence on real results and a different way of thinking.

Vice President Pence versus President Trump on Foreign Policy

Washington should stop thinking of containment. Rather, the Trump administration should begin disengagement, devolving onto the Europeans responsibility for their defense.

After the Coup, What Then?

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

My guess: The reaction will be one of bitterness, cynicism, despair, a sense that the fix is in, that no matter what we do, they will not let us win. If Trump is brought down, American democracy will take a pasting. It will be seen as a fraud. And the backlash will poison our politics to where only an attack from abroad, like 9/11, will reunite us.

Liberals’ Class Warfare on the Working Class Keeps Trump Afloat

John Fund, National Review

Donald Trump won because he recognized the nature of that class war and appealed to those who were being hurt by it. Democrats aren’t likely to win back the voters they’ve lost until they realize that many of those voters won’t even listen to them if there isn’t a truce in the class war they see being waged against them.

No ID Theft Or Illegal Voting Going On Here Folks

Attorney General Jeff Sessions' Department of Justice has busted a scheme to produce false identification documents through the Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles. Some of the false identities and addresses were used to fraudulently register to vote in the City of Boston.

Outsiders vs. Insiders: Everything the media ever wanted to know they learned in preschool

The establishment media is kind of like preschoolers in a classroom. They wander around, completely oblivious to the storm going on outside. To them, their entire world is confined within their four walls. The leaders lead, the followers follow and the whiners whine.

Is America on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown or Civil War?

Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

We are clearly on the edge of something explosive. The number of leaks is astronomical and they seem to come from everywhere, including our intelligence agencies, the FBI, and inside the White House. When the most important law enforcement agency in our country lies and leaks, as it has more than once now, something is truly wrong.

Outsiders vs. Insiders: Talk of GOP civil war has Trump-bashers digging holes in preparation

Trump will continue to have his detractors and if there is a “civil war” in the GOP, the first shot will certainly come from the establishment side. If these elites keep it up they’ll have more than enough volunteers to dig a huge hole and throw the entire Republican Party into it.

Lawyers, witches, broomsticks, and the swamp

Wesley Pruden, Washington Times

An ambitious special counsel can keep a client paying out for years, and the U.S. government is the best client of all because it’s a bottomless pit of cash, easy for the plucking. Mueller has only to worry that the president could do a Comey on him. Sacking a special prosecutor, or counsel, might be suicide for a president, but Donald Trump is unpredictable.

Is Trump’s Russia Policy Being Hijacked?

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

Does Trump believe that confronting Putin with rising casualties among his army and allies in Ukraine is the way to force the Russian president to back down and withdraw from Crimea, Luhansk and Donetsk, as Nikita Khrushchev did from Cuba in 1962? What if Putin refuses to back down, and chooses to confront?

Meanwhile Over In Moscow

With help from President Reagan’s former Attorney General Ed Meese and from Jon Utley’s Freda Utley Foundation, which provided funding, a statue of Presidents Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev was recently unveiled in Moscow.

Outsiders vs. Insiders: Bad Democrat advice plus no spine equals no wins for hapless GOP

Republican legislative victories certainly won’t happen if more Republican senators look to Democrats for answers to the most vexing political questions of today. Many intra-party high hurdles remain before the GOP actually gets something done – and Democrats won’t help, either.

President McMaster Purges Donald Trump’s People From The NSC

The NSC isn’t H.R. McMaster's to mold to his views; it is President Trump’s National Security Council and it should have Trump’s people, not McMaster's people, staffing it.

Outsiders vs. Insiders: When did it become cool to embrace the abnormal in American culture?

There’s no place for personal expression in government service and the people aren’t “bigots” or “intolerant” for wanting public servants to observe reasonable standards of dress and decorum. It’s common sense; and culture is culture in spite of the left’s best efforts to change it.

Trump turns to his generals in times of trouble

W. James Antle III, Washington Examiner

President Trump second-guessed generals on the campaign trail, but in office he has relied heavily on their counsel, with the ascension of retired Gen. John Kelly to White House chief of staff serving as the latest example. Kelly is now the general at the helm of the White House staff. Trump gained confidence in him during his service as secretary of Homeland Security, a position from which he often had to defend the president's controversial positions on immigration and national security.

Trump — And the Use and Abuse of Madness

Victor Davis Hanson, National Review

As president, Trump’s chaos and erratic rhetoric, when in concert with an impressive cabinet, has sometimes served him well. But if he fails to see that there is an art of madness like his own arts of the deal, then he will soon become wearisome and Berlusconi-like rather than feared and Reaganesque.