Immigration

Stories related to immigration reform and immigration amnesty

An America First immigration policy

Stephen Moore, Washington Times

Immigrants who need financial assistance should get it from their sponsors, churches, charities or relatives, not American taxpayers. We need E-verify not at workplaces, but in welfare offices. Immigrants who do go on welfare should have their visas suspended. Under the right conditions, it’s hard to imagine that millions of bright, hard working and freedom-seeking immigrants would not want to come to the United States. The most valuable asset in the world is a U.S. Passport and we should stop giving it away for free.

Democrats need to wake up and realize that open borders are not fiscally sustainable

Bryan Dean Wright, Fox News

In late 2016 the Obama administration published an alarming study that showed upwards of 47 percent of American jobs might be eliminated due to the technological advances in robotics, automation and machine learning (RAML). The most vulnerable jobs included those filled by workers with lower pay, lower skills and less education. Democrats must accept that open borders are not fiscally sustainable and that tough choices must be made about whom and how many immigrants we embrace.

President Trump’s Speech To CPAC Leaves #NeverTrump Gang Squirming

The intelligentsia of the Right and Left will continue to talk down Donald Trump and claim his remarks to CPAC just weren’t up to presidential standards. What they don’t understand is Trump’s stream of consciousness asides are exactly were he connects with the voters and what differentiates him from the inside-the-Beltway political class that voters despise.

Conservatives Want Ryan Out if Amnesty Passes House

Speaker Paul Ryan promised that no immigration reform bill would come before the House unless it was supported by a majority of House Republicans. If he breaks that promise almost 95% of conservatives responding to a recent FedUp PAC poll say that if Ryan breaks that promise he should be deposed as speaker and replaced by someone President Trump can trust.

Why Democrats Really Don’t Want To Reinstate The Citizenship Question On The U.S. Census

Ben Weingarten, The Federalist

We face a situation today in which non-citizens are treated as a protected class whom our elites seems to prefer over deplorable Americans. This was perhaps the seminal meta-narrative of the 2016 presidential election that resulted in Donald Trump. But have our betters learned anything?

Democrats Fear Debate about Dreamers Will Pivot to One on ‘Chain Migration’

John Fund, National Review

Democrats who precipitated the shutdown love to cite statistics that show that 80 percent of Americans want to allow the Dreamers to stay — as no doubt any final resolution will allow. But they should worry that the longer the shutdown debate is focused on immigration, the more Americans will come to realize it’s about our underlying U.S. immigration policy — and Democrats are coming to realize just how shaky defending that ground might become.

Conservatives Want Trump to Be Trump

More than 54% of conservatives responding to the FedUp PAC poll take the position that Trump “should continue to say the same thing in the same way about merit-based immigration.” Another 39% agree with Trump about the necessity of moving to merit-based immigration but say that he “should be more careful about the language he uses.”

Trump’s merit-based immigration system

Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Washington Times

President Trump ran for office arguing for a merit-based system that lets in the best and the brightest but turns away criminals — even if they do have a relative here. It’s a commonsense idea. After all, employers don’t roll dice when deciding who they want to hire. Our incredible military doesn’t draw straws when deciding whom to accept. But for some reason, when we’re picking new Americans — the future of this country — our government uses a randomized lottery system and chain migration.

Good News vs. Private Conversations

R. Emmett Tyrrell, Jr., The American Spectator

Last week the headlines should have abounded with the year’s good news. Instead the headlines—and the cable news stories — abounded with a private remark made by our President — or perhaps not made by our President; he denies making it. I am not particularly disturbed by our passionate and earthy 45th President’s resort to salty language in discussing what kinds of immigration legislation are desirable for the United States. Though I think there are more important issues to discuss and even celebrate. As I have said, how about that economy!

You think Democrats want to fix immigration? Dream on!

Editors, Washington Examiner

It is much easier to point to President Trump's crude comments on immigration than it is to handle the truth, which is that his opponents want an argument rather than action. In an election year, immigration is far more powerful for Democrats as a political issue than it is as an accomplishment in the rearview mirror. They know this just as they have always known it, and so they're digging in their heels and throwing obstacles in the way of a solution.

Trump: In Immigration Debate, Race Matters

Patrick J. Buchanan, CNS News

Mass immigration means an America in 2050 with no core majority, made up of minorities of every race, color, religion and culture on earth, a continent-wide replica of the wonderful diversity we see today in the U.N. General Assembly. Such a country has never existed before. Are we on the Yellow Brick Road to the new Utopia — or on the path to national suicide?

What if diversity isn't America's strength?

Jonah Goldberg, Los Angeles Times

If you read the Federalist Papers, you'll learn that among the top priorities of the founders was to ensure that the government, particularly any branch of government, not be too powerful. The Bill of Rights is all about constraining the power of government. The Constitution never once mentions the words "strength" or "strong." Neither does the Declaration of Independence. But both documents talk a great deal about freedom and liberty.

Importing The S**thole

Scott McKay, The American Spectator

Trump’s “s***holes” objection is big news rather than the fact there are so-called political leaders who can’t agree to reorient our immigration policy toward taking people who can successfully assimilate here. Between the two, the crude man who tells the truth and looks out for his own citizens is preferable to the genteel man who sells us out for cheap labor or ballot-box fuel for a political machine. If Trump is the former, so be it.

Limbaugh: Trump's Televised Immigration Meeting Flawlessly Executed Rebuttal To Wolff

Ian Schwartz, Real Clear Politics

Limbaugh: It was not about immigration. It was to counter the Wolff book. It was to get rid of it, it was to toss it aside, it was to rebut it. It was to nuke it. It was to dispel it. It was to render it meaningless and to have it seen for what it is: A pack of lies. Now, some people might say, “Gee, I don’t think that was good reason to do this. You don’t want to be defensive about it.” Well, I’m sure at the White House they’ll tell you this wasn’t a defensive move, that this was them on offense.

Donald Trump—the Grownup in the Room on Immigration

Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

Donald Trump gets called crazy a lot. Or infantile. Or senile. More than a bit of projection may be operative in these allegations, however. Watching Tuesday's televised discussion of immigration with Democratic and Republican congressional leaders, which the president opened to the media, it was hard not to come to an opposite conclusion. Donald Trump was the real grownup in the room.

With DC distracted, immigration debate reaches critical point

Byron York, Washington Examiner

It is a decisive moment in the Trump presidency, and in the debate over immigration. Right now, it's fair to say nearly no one in the Washington press corps is paying much attention — they would much rather discuss Steve Bannon, or the 25th Amendment, or whether the president watches too much TV. But the coming weeks will be crucial for the agenda that won Donald Trump the White House.

The 2010s look more like Trump's ideal America than Obama's

Michael Barone, Washington Examiner

The patterns of internal and immigrant migration of 2010-17 looks less like Barack Obama’s ideal America and more like Donald Trump’s. The flight from high-tax to low-tax states, diminished by higher-skill immigration, the fracking boom in North Dakota, and the decline in hip Vermont: You might even say Trump started winning even when Obama was still in office.

Trump’s National Security Strategy: A Welcome Break From Obama And Bush

Neocons, the congressional war party, and the military – industrial complex will no doubt be ready to criticize President Trump’s national security strategy as a retreat from America’s role in the world – but nothing could be further from the truth.

The Unintended Consequences of the Steinle Decision

Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

The real villains in the Kate Steinle story are the San Francisco politicians who made the rules that prevented ICE from removing the already five-time deported criminal Zarate from the country. These SF pols already had Kate's murder forever on their consciences, what they have of them anyway. Now they will also have to deal with the growing disgust of the American public and an administration that loathes these politicians, backed up by a Supreme Court that will ultimately be on the side of that administration for most actions it might take.

The Coming Year-End Immigration Disaster

Until the Democrat and Republican establishments are voted out of office DACA and other programs to benefit illegal aliens will never be stopped and legislation by year-end train wreck will continue to be their preferred vehicle for forcing these policies on an increasingly resistant public.