Senate

Why the Cruz amendment is smart policy

Stephen Moore, CNN

If the GOP is smart enough to rally behind the Cruz amendment, and health costs and premiums start falling almost immediately, we will start to have what Obamacare never delivered: affordable care. And by the way, Trump will get reelected in a landslide and so will congressional Republicans.

Republicans wish Trump would use the Obamacare bully pulpit

David M. Drucker, Washington Examiner

Through focused, public campaigning, the president could harness that support to ease passage of the healthcare overhaul. In some cases, Trump's influence might create more political support; in others, he might generate pressure that spurs senators to act. Trump has yet to wield the power of the presidency with a speech or vintage Trump campaign rally dedicated to healthcare. His recent campaign-style appearances have been freewheeling affairs, reminiscent of his traveling 2016 road show.

Republicans, bring your healthcare bill out for inspection

Editors, Washington Examiner

Policymakers have an obligation to convince the public when they are changing laws and policies. Legislative leaders have an obligation to give their members the chance to propose changes, defend their proposals, and, when it is possible, hold votes on their ideas. If your idea for solving a problem doesn't make it into the final bill, it will then be because it lost a vote and lawmakers found a different solution.

Trump's impatience with GOP establishment grows

Alexander Bolton, The Hill

An impatient President Trump is putting new pressure on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) to get rid of the filibuster in order to speed progress on legislation repealing ObamaCare and reforming the tax code. In a message posted Tuesday on Twitter, Trump urged Republican senators to invoke the so-called nuclear option and “switch to 51 votes, immediately, and get Healthcare and TAX CUTS approved, fast and easy.”

The House’s Job Now? Keep Calm

Kimberley Strassel, Wall Street Journal

House Republicans have an obligation to their struggling constituents to embrace any idea that can make the bill better—even if it isn’t their own. They also have an obligation to work as open-mindedly with the Senate as they recently did with each other. The enemy isn’t fellow Republicans. It’s ObamaCare.

When politicians judge jurists

Andrew P. Napolitano, Washington Times

The Senate is a political body, and its members are politicians. One of the reasons Justice Scalia gave for rejecting as an interpretive tool the statements made by members of Congress when they passed any legislation under scrutiny is the truism that politicians have only one goal in their work, no matter what they are saying — to get re-elected. The senators examining Judge Gorsuch are probably more concerned with that than with doing the right thing for the court. I hope that in this respect, I am wrong, as I have been before.

Judging Judge Gorsuch

William Murchison, The American Spectator

The left understands Gorsuch to represent the non-political temperament it would exclude from the court, so as to broaden the ability to impose on the American people (bless their pointed heads) plans and objectives for which they have not asked. The left, this time, may not get away with it. Too many of us see what its spokesmen and propagandists are really up to.

Conservatives ratchet up pressure to ditch Senate rules

Susan Crabtree, Washington Examiner

Groups on the right, such as Americans for Limited Government, and like-minded lawmakers, including Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, are pressing GOP leaders to circumvent the parliamentarian this year. They argue that the House version, as written, doesn't have enough GOP votes to pass, so Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., will have no choice but to add more provisions that Freedom Caucus members want, such as getting rid of the insurance mandate and required "essential" benefits.

Nuke Them, Mitch

Scott McKay, The American Spectator

McConnell doesn’t even need to use the nuclear option to destroy a filibuster of Gorsuch on the Supreme Court, though to do so is more than warranted by Schumer’s irresponsible statements. It might even be more entertaining were he to require, in order to sustain the filibuster, that the Democrats actively hold the Senate floor. He ought to tell Schumer to supply his people with lots of Red Bull, protein bars, and adult diapers, if they planned on filibustering Gorsuch — because they’d be up all night.

Why Left Opposes Sessions: He's Right; They're Wrong

Terence P. Jeffrey, CNS News

The confirmation fight over Session has been intense, but it is merely a prelude to the domestic Cold War confrontation we will see over Supreme Court nominations. If Trump names pro-life constitutionalists — as he has promised — the battle cry then must be taken from Ronald Reagan: We win, they lose.

Conservative Ohio Treasurer Josh Mandel Emerging As Consensus Candidate For Senate

Although it is early, we like what we see in Josh Mandel, particularly his fiscal conservatism and his willingness to tell it like it is about the war Islam has declared on the West.

Coalition to Reduce Spending Launching "What’s my Congressman’s Number?"

The Coalition to Reduce Spending has created “What’s my Congressman’s Number,” a new project for spending accountability. When it launches in 2017, everyday Americans will be able to view, in real time, how much money their Representatives and Senators are spending.

Democrats honed the dog whistle of racism on Sessions

Charles Hurt, Washington Times

Now, Mr. Sessions will once again face the United States Senate to be President Donald Trump’s attorney general. The same liberal special interest groups in Washington who thwarted him 30 years ago have declared that they aim to do the same to him this time.

Reeling Democrats confront brutal 2018 Senate map

Burgess Everett, Politico

Still nursing their wounds after last week’s thrashing, Democrats already are grappling with how to defend 10 senators up for reelection in 2018 in states that Donald Trump carried, some resoundingly. Republicans are targeting a quintet of senators from conservative states where Trump walloped Hillary Clinton: Montana, Missouri, Indiana, North Dakota and West Virginia. The GOP could amass a filibuster-proof majority by running the table in those states and other battlegrounds.

Republicans Hold the Senate on a Night that Defied the Odds

Eliana Johnson, National Review

Republican Senate candidates spent most of the election season running away from Donald Trump, fearful that supporting him would sink their campaigns and cost their party the Senate majority. And yet it was in part Trump’s shocking electoral-college victory against Hillary Clinton that helped Republicans hold the upper chamber against long odds.

Sayonara, Harry Reid

Fred Barnes, Wall Street Journal

Mr. Reid’s leadership changed the Senate dramatically but often carelessly. The upper chamber had traditionally been collegial, high-minded, cautious. During Mr. Reid’s tenure as majority leader from 2007 to 2015, it became more like the House. There was less time for serious floor debates and amendments. Decorum suffered. So did bipartisanship.

So Far, Trump Is Not Sinking Down-Ballot Republicans

Michael Barone, National Review

So far, down-ballot contests look less like the straight-ticket battles of recent years, in which few candidates ran significantly ahead of or behind party nominees. Instead, they look more like 1970s and 1980s contests, in which many incumbents and challengers, mostly Democrats but also Republicans, continually improvised and created individual personas tailored to their constituencies and capable of distinguishing them from unpopular national party leaders.

The Warren-Sanders Presidency

Daniel Henninger, Wall Street Journal

Do not for a moment think Elizabeth Warren is barnstorming the country now only to elect Hillary Clinton. She’s getting out the vote to make sure Elizabeth Warren is in position next year to co-run the government from Capitol Hill.

Which party will win the Senate and House?

Michael Barone, Washington Examiner

Turnout has been declining, not increasing, during the Obama years, and the Clinton campaign is clearly worried about low turnout, especially among millennials. The Senate and House contests may turn on which side's turnout sags most.

It’s Now or Never to Save the Internet

Our economy and security are increasingly dependent on the Internet. We should not be taking a blind leap into the unknown. But that is exactly what the Obama administration is proposing by handing over control of the Internet to an unelected body that includes anti-constitutional authoritarian governments and state sponsors of terrorism.