South Korea

Behind The Scenes Shifts In American Foreign Policy Led To Summit Success

President Trump said before the meeting, “It’s a process” and so far, the results of the Trump – Kim Summit have been encouraging enough to call the summit a success, however, it remains to be seen if the behind the scenes changes in U.S. policy outlined here will ultimately result in the desired goal of a nuclear-free North Korea.

How President Donald Trump Can Make the Most of the Summit

CHQ contributor Doug Bandow offers eight suggestions about how President Trump can make the most of the summit with North Korea's dictator Kim Jong Un, including ending the U.S. “hostile policy” toward North Korea in return for Pyongyang’s commitment to denuclearize.

Kim Jong Un Should Have Read 'The Art Of The Deal'

In Trump’s analysis, the latest North Korean verbal assault was an obvious prelude to cancelling the summit, and the necessary counter was to cancel before they did, putting his adversary in the weaker position of having to ask him to come back to the table.

Trump Eyes Wide Open On North Korea

President Trump seems to share President Reagan’s genuine horror at the thought of nuclear war, a deeply held belief that drove Reagan to engage Soviet Premier Gorbachev in both diplomatic negotiations to reduce nuclear weapons and a strategic competition that eventually brought down the Soviet Union.

Korean 'peace' must include nuclear disarmament

Editors, Washington Examiner

While smiles and pledges are good, they must not distract Trump from the exigency of time. He should meet Kim Jong Un as soon as possible and test the sincerity of his interlocutor’s smile by requesting that IAEA snap inspectors be given immediate access to North Korean laboratories. We must verify that North Korea has stopped its development of nuclear and ICBM technology. We must also be able to make sure that North Korea abandons all its nuclear weapons.

Run Operation Iron Mask against North Korea’s Kim Jong-un

The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea is almost unique to the degree that power is exercised by one man. However, rather than taking "Little Rocket Man" out through violent regime change CHQ contributor Doug Bandow offers a not entirely tongue in cheek plan to substitute a new Kim Jong-un for the real one.

‘Little Rocket Man’ Wins the Round

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

The calculation is that what Americans fear most, and the one thing that deters them, is nuclear weapons. Once Soviet Russia and Communist China acquired nukes, the Americans never attacked them. If he can put nuclear weapons on U.S. troops in Korea, U.S. bases in Japan, and U.S. cities, Kim reasons, the Americans will not launch a war on him. Have not recent events proven him right?

The Economy Says Trump Is Crazy Like A Fox

By every measure we could find Americans are doing better under crazy President Donald Trump than they were under the cool, suave and eminently sane Barack Obama. Apparently, investors, who have billions on the line, aren’t worried that our President is deranged.

America's Indispensable Friends

Victor Davis Hanson, National Review

A country is not just defined by its economic and military strength, its global clout or its powerful allies. It is also judged on how it treats weaker but humane nations. As long as the U.S. remains good to these impressive but vulnerable states, it will remain great as well.

Is War With Iran Or North Korea Inevitable?

Certainly, a nuclear-armed ICBM-equipped North Korea or Iran is intolerable to our interests and to the future of western civilization. The question for President Trump is at what point do the other options available to stop the threat be judged failures?

War With North Korea Is Not An Option

Stepping back militarily and allowing the prosperous and populous states of South Korea, Japan and Australia to take over their own defense surely is better than starting the very war Washington has spent 64 years attempting to prevent.

What If South Korea Acted Like North Korea?

Victor Davis Hanson, National Review

China did not fail to realize that North Korea was developing a nuclear arsenal. Rather, it calculated that North Korea would do exactly what it is now doing, and that such nuclear roguery would serve China’s strategic interests on the Korean peninsula and in its rivalries with both the United States and with America’s allies in Asia. In other words, if China were in America’s position, we would have likely witnessed a tragically destructive war a long time ago.

Should Japan and South Korea Go Nuclear?

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

North Korea devotes 25 percent of GDP to defense. South Korea spends 2.6 percent, Japan one percent. Yet these mighty Asian allies, who run annual trade surpluses at our expense, require us to defend them from a maniacal little country right next door. After this crisis, South Korea and Japan should begin to make the kind of defense effort the U.S. does, and create their own nuclear deterrents.

Counterpoint: Why Should North Korea Believe the United States?

No one knows what President Trump believes about the Koreas. He has made many contradictory comments while Senators John McCain and Lindsey Graham have been talking up the likelihood of war.

South Korea Elects the Anti-Trump: Whither the Washington-Seoul Alliance?

The policies of newly elected South Korean President Moon Jae-in vary sharply from those of the Trump administration. Many of Moon’s proposals would undercut, even obstruct, Washington’s objectives.

Will Donald Trump Start the Second Korean War?

There is no magic solution to the North Korea Problem. But military action should be a last resort, reserved for preempting a direct and imminent threat that doesn’t presently exist. Washington must avoid triggering the Second Korean War.

Pence Says Trump Will End Decades Of Failed North Korea Policy

"We're going to abandon the failed policy of strategic patience. But we're going to redouble our efforts to bring diplomatic and economic pressure to bear on North Korea. Our hope is that we can resolve this issue peaceably," Pence said in an exclusive interview at the Korean DMZ.

If China Wants to Lead the World, it must Trust Its Own People

People who do not trust those who govern are unlikely to embrace the government. Beijing cannot compel genuine loyalty.

U.S. Should Stop Reassuring South Korea: Status Quo is Brain Dead

The U.S.-South Korea alliance has outlived its usefulness. Instead of reassuring Seoul, the Trump administration should prepare to renegotiate the alliance, creating a looser but more equal cooperative military relationship. South Korea should take on responsibilities commensurate with its capabilities.