Spying

Diana West: Barr 'will keep a lid on questions about this Special Counsel investigation'

While many conservatives have applauded Attorney Barr’s comments during his recent CBS News interview, our friend author Diana West parsed his words closely and concluded they indicate that, rather than blowing away the smokescreen masking the Deep State conspiracy against President Trump, Mr. Barr is intent on managing it.

No question there was spying on Trump campaign, but how much?

Byron York, Washington Examiner

There was no doubt spying happened. Now, the question is whether there was more than is now publicly known. Congressional investigators are anxiously awaiting the results of an investigation into at least some of the surveillance by Justice Department inspector general Michael Horowitz. That report is thought to be coming in the next couple of months. They are also watching to see what Barr will investigate on his own. Both are deeply important efforts. Just as the public needed to know what is in the Mueller report, it needs to know about the FBI's secret political operations in the 2016 campaign.

Barr is right, spying on Trump campaign did occur

Byron York, Washington Examiner

Cable news commentators called Barr's statement "stunning" and appeared baffled that the attorney general would make such a claim "without evidence." The baffling thing was why they were baffled. Barr's statement was accurate and supported by publicly known facts. There is simply no doubt that the FBI wiretapped a Trump campaign figure. Is a wiretap "spying"? It is hard to imagine a practice more associated with spying. Despite the cries from outraged Democrats and the media analysts who simply can't imagine what Barr might have been referring to, the attorney general's words were demonstrably true.

New Poll: Conservatives Say Revoke Their Security Clearances

A new FedUp PAC poll shows that conservatives overwhelmingly agree that President Trump should revoke the security clearances of those involved in the unfolding scandal regarding the Obama administration’s spying on people in the Trump campaign.

The London-to-Langley Spy Ring

George Neumayr, The American Spectator

What started in late 2015 with promise ended in panic, with British sources for the alleged Trump-Russia collusion going silent or mysteriously disappearing. A few days after Trump’s inauguration, the director of GCHQ, Robert Hannigan, abruptly resigned, prompting the Guardian to wonder if the sudden resignation was related to “British concerns over shared intelligence with the US.” All of this raises plenty of questions, but one conclusion about this epic fiasco requires no spying: the fingerprints of the British are all over it.

So They Were Spying On Trump's Campaign

L. Brent Bozell III and Tim Graham, CNS News

Doesn't pushing the idea that Trump colluded with the Russians require "a conspiratorial mind"? Is it fair to speculate endlessly on CNN and MSNBC about how special counsel Robert Mueller might prove collusion, when he hasn't done so after a year of trying? The media don't have to prove their Trump conspiracy theory to damage Trump's political standing. It can keep that black cloud of speculation hanging over his head on every front page and every newscast.

The Inspector General's Report Will Expose the MSM as Treasonous

Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

So what will the mainstream media who participated so heavily in this, who were in effect the enabler of this disgraceful anti-democratic enterprise, do when the inspector general's report is finally published? These next few weeks are going to be among the most interesting in our lifetimes -- especially for our friends in the press. We know from the NYT earlier this week they are preparing their excuses. Let's hope they don't have enough.

10 times the intel community violated the trust of US citizens, lawmakers and allies

Sharyl Attkisson, The Hill

Think all this really doesn’t matter to you, as a private citizen? You never know. Reality hit home for me when multiple computer forensics reports confirmed extensive government surveillance of me while I reported for CBS News during the Obama administration. Rather than cooperate or expose the bad actors, today’s Department of Justice is opposing my lawsuit over those intrusions in Virginia federal court.

It looks like Obama did spy on Trump, just as he apparently did to me

Sharyl Attkisson, The Hill

It seems that government monitoring of journalists, members of Congress and political enemies — under multiple administrations — has become more common than anyone would have imagined two decades ago. So has the unmasking of sensitive and highly protected names by political officials.

Confession: I Was a Friend of a Russian Spy

Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

When I watch the congressional hearings on Russia what I see is nothing but truly nauseating hypocrisy, pompous bores like Dick Durbin inveighing against possible collusion with Moscow, the same people who ten years ago -- make that ten months -- would have been saying the opposite and urging the very collusion they now condemn. (My bet is that Durbin et al. spoke to more than a few Russian spies in their day, wittingly or not.)

Susan Rice’s Revealing Twitter Account

George Neumayr, The American Spectator

To press flunkies, Susan Rice casts her espionage as high-minded, national-security-based vigilance. But on her Twitter account she doesn’t bother to keep up that charade. That she would re-tweet the partisan hackery of someone like the Washington Post's E.J. Dionne indicates the depth of partisanship behind her espionage.

Could Russia Be Spying on US?

Michael S. Schmidt and Eric Schmitt, New York Times

The CIA and the Pentagon have been quietly waging a campaign to stop the State Department from allowing the Russian space agency to build half a dozen antenna structures, known as monitor stations, on U.S. soil.