Supreme Court

FLASH: Supreme Court Reinstates Trump Terrorist Travel ban

Today's Supreme Court ruling means that the administration may impose a 90-day ban on travelers from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen and a 120-day ban on all refugees entering the United States, with certain exceptions noted by the court.

Trump Immigration Order Took Another Hit: Now SCOTUS Must Get Involved

Hans von Spakovsky, CNS News

If the lower courts are uniformly getting it wrong and failing to follow the Supreme Court’s binding precedents on an issue, that is a more than sufficient reason to take up a case. In fact, the court has an obligation to do so in order to prevent chaos in the legal system resulting from lower courts refusing to follow the law. That is especially true when the judicial branch is interfering with the president’s prerogatives in the national security and immigration area.

Gorsuch Gets Comfortable in Scalia’s Chair

Kenneth Star, Wall Street Journal

Thursday afternoon, Justice Gorsuch will ceremonially take the chair Scalia occupied for almost 30 years. At his confirmation hearing, he called Scalia a mentor who “reminded us that words matter—that the judge’s job is to follow the words that are in the law, not replace them with those that aren’t.” Antonin Scalia changed the way mainstream judges think about their role in a representative democracy. On this investiture day, the Scalia tradition boasts a worthy inheritor.

SCOTUS Refuses to Hear NC’s Voter ID Appeal

Hans von Spakovsky, CNS News

Thirty-two states require some form of ID in voting, although not all of them require a photo ID. And states are continuing to pass such needed laws. Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad just signed into law a new voter ID law in his state. State legislators and the public should not allow the 4th Circuit decision to deter them from taking the steps necessary—including commonsense voter ID requirements—to improve the integrity of our elections.

Trump's first 100 days: Our next Supreme Court pick will be the kicker

Hans A. von Spakovsky, Fox News

Whoever the next departing justice is, President Trump must make sure the next Supreme Court justice is someone who believes in the Constitution and the Bill of Rights 100 percent of the time, not just when it is convenient to achieve the particular policy goal the justice wants. And President Trump will need someone who doesn't care what the New York Times, MSNBC, or the Washington cocktail circuit says about him or her.

Gorsuch Asks The Right Questions

Asking the right questions doesn’t mean that Justice Gorsuch will reach the right decisions in these or any future case before the Court.  However, conservatives can take encouragement that Justice Gorsuch is starting from the plain language of the Constitution and the statues Congress has passed, not the whims and fantasies of other judges.

How Mitch McConnell Won the Battle to Confirm Gorsuch

Fred Barnes, Weekly Standard

Rather than scrapping tradition, the end of the judicial filibuster restores a longstanding tradition of not using it against nominees for judgeships. That tradition was tossed out in 2003 when Democrats began filibustering Republican nominees. That was new. The old way, the traditional way, was followed in the confirmation battle over Clarence Thomas in 1990. To say he was a highly controversial pick is putting it mildly. Despite this, no one called for a filibuster or said there's a rule that says 60 votes are required. Thomas was confirmed, 52-48.

Nixon, LBJ, and the First Shots in the Judges’ War

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

The Democrats’ drive to defeat Neil Gorsuch is the latest battle in a 50-year war for control of the Supreme Court—a war that began with a conspiracy against Richard Nixon by Chief Justice Earl Warren, Justice Abe Fortas, and Lyndon Johnson. Behind the hostility to the mild-mannered and decent Neil Gorsuch lies the same malevolence that lynched Clement Haynsworth.

Supreme Court needs judges like Gorsuch because America has leaders like Schumer

Editors, Washington Examiner

Schumer's chosen role as demagogue stands in stark contrast to what is demanded of judges and can be expected of Gorsuch. Judges and justices are charged with upholding the Constitution and applying justice fairly to everyone. Most of them, liberal or conservative, would never endanger the rule of law with careless comments like those Schumer has made in longstanding and unsuccessful efforts politicize the judiciary.

Of Course Court Fights Are Bitter -- Judicial arrogance is the ultimate cause.

Jay Cost, The Weekly Standard

A vacancy is that rare opportunity for the people to remind the Court that its job is to protect our liberties without interfering unduly with our right to rule ourselves. We should hope that our representatives work their hardest to get this message across. Does this "politicize" the nomination process? Sure. But politics is essential to republican government, and the Court needs politicizing, if only once in a while, to remind it who is really in charge.

The Judicial Coup Against President Trump

For all intents and purposes the President’s powers as Commander in Chief and his executive power to maintain the country’s sovereignty have been seized by 97 globalist technology companies and an unelected judge in the Western District of Washington.

Angling for a Supreme Pick -- How Trump landed Neil Gorsuch

Fred Barnes, Weekly Standard

Gorsuch best fits the Scalia model. Like Scalia, he is a great writer, though his opinions are less biting than Scalia's. He knew Scalia and went fly fishing with him in Colorado, Gorsuch's home state. That event has been memorialized in a now-famous picture of the two wading in a river. Also, three of Gorsuch's law clerks went on to clerk for Scalia. In short, his connection to Scalia gave Gorsuch a powerful assist.

Trump's Gorsuch Pick: Promises Made, Promises Kept

Ann Corkery, Real Clear Politics

Donald Trump has fulfilled his promises with this exceptional nominee. Now, it is time for the Senate to promptly do its part. It’s time for the Senate to give Judge Gorsuch a full and fair hearing and an up-or-down vote so the Supreme Court can get back to work at full capacity.

Trump Fulfills Another Promise

George Neumayr, The American Spectator

Trump promised to select a nominee from his “list of 21 judges” vetted by conservatives, and he has fulfilled that promise. Once again, the supposedly unserious Trump has no problem settling upon a serious nominee.

The Constitution will be stronger with Gorsuch on the Supreme Court

Matthew Spalding, Washington Examiner

Gorsuch's career is full of decisions in accord with Scalia's opinions on religious liberty, the Second Amendment, criminal laws, and the commerce clause. To the delight of law students everywhere, Gorsuch's legal writing is even likened to Scalia: His decisions are both clear and powerful.

Stick to your list, Mr. President

Editors, Washington Examiner

Nothing will unify the right better than a fight against hypocritical obstructionist Democrats with abortion, religious liberty, free speech, and the Second Amendment at stake. Donald Trump has had political success by being unpredictable. Now is not the time, and the Supreme Court is not the issue, to give the country any more surprises.

For Supreme Court, No Moore Grudges, Please

Quin Hillyer, The American Spectator

It is said that conservatives, like elephants, never forget — and apparently some of them never forgive, either. For very good reason, conservative 11th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge William Pryor is reportedly on President-elect Trump’s short list for a Supreme Court nomination. Strangely, some of the fiercest opposition to Pryor comes from a small band of Christian conservatives. Their arguments are sincere, but wrongheaded.

How to Replace Justice Scalia on the Supreme Court

Rob Natelson, The American Spectator

President-elect Trump says he wants to nominate a justice like the late Antonin Scalia to the U.S. Supreme Court. That means a justice who follows the judicial philosophy of “originalism.” Originalism is the view that we should interpret the Constitution much as we interpret other legal documents — in accordance with the understanding of the people who adopted it.

How Catholics Swung the Electoral College to Donald Trump: Part 3 of 3

By Richard A. Viguerie, CHQ Chairman
The results of our campaign to turn the Catholic vote away from Hillary Clinton to Donald Trump speak for themselves. In the top four battleground states Trump won Wisconsin (where 31 percent identify as Catholic) by 22,177 votes. In Pennsylvania (where 27.4 percent identify as Catholic) Trump won by 67,416 votes. In Florida (where 26 percent identify as Catholic) Trump won by 134,000 votes and in Michigan (where 23 percent identify as Catholic) Trump won by 10,704 votes.