Trump

Special Counsel Means Congress Must Start Legislating

Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

Congress should absolutely go back to their day job -- enacting legislation -- immediately. It might be hard work and less glamorous than pontificating about the state of the nation or the malfeasances of the current administration -- they may actually have to read something -- but it was what they were elected to do, what we pay them to do. The high-profile investigations can go on hold while Mueller goes about his work.

Obamacare repeal gives senators a break from Trump scandals

Robert King, Washington Examiner

Replacing Obamacare has become a pleasant topic for Senate Republicans, who are being bombarded with questions about President Trump's scandals. Lawmakers are relishing the chance to avoid talking about the Comey memo, Trump's firing of Comey a week ago and news that Trump gave highly classified intelligence to top Russian officials.

Trump Must Nix HHS Mandate

Bill Donohue, CNS News

The majority of Catholics voted for Donald Trump, and many did so because he identified himself as pro-life and ran against a candidate who justified partial-birth abortion. He also said he would rescind the HHS mandate that makes Catholic non-profits complicit in providing for abortion-inducing drugs, sterilization, and contraception in their healthcare plans. Now his Justice Department is balking on this issue.

Susan Rice’s White House Unmasking: A Watergate-style Scandal

Andrew C. McCarthy, National Review

The national-security adviser is not an investigator. She is a White House staffer. The president’s staff is a consumer of intelligence, not a generator or collector of it. If Susan Rice was unmasking Americans, it was not to fulfill an intelligence need based on American interests; it was to fulfill a political desire based on Democratic-party interests.

An Obama Plot Against Trump?

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

So far, the Russia-connection investigation has proven a dry hole. But an investigation into who in the FBI, CIA, or NSA is unmasking U.S. citizens and criminally leaking information to a Trump-hating press to destroy a president they are sworn to serve could prove to be a gusher. What did Barack Obama know, and when did he know it?

Time to Investigate Obama, not Just Trump

Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

Any legitimate investigation by a congressional committee or anyone else must encompass both Obama and Trump.  This is a two-part story.  If both parties are not investigated -- they cannot be separated -- this is no more than a partisan show.  Further, the press cannot even faintly be trusted to investigate or adjudicate this matter.  Their bias is so overwhelming it would sink the Titanic twice.

So Who Fact-Checks the Fact-Checkers?

Debra J. Saunders, The American Spectator

A recent NBC News poll shows that a mere 11 percent of voters would describe Clinton as “honest and trustworthy.” Yet in a complete repudiation of public sentiment, PolitiFact’s rating for Hillary Clinton finds her statements are true or mostly true half the time, half-true 22 percent of the time and false or mostly false 26 percent of the time — but “pants-on-fire” false 2 percent of the time.

Trump assumes GOP mantle with Indiana win

Rebecca Berg, Real Clear Politics

Until recently, it seemed possible, if not likely, that Cruz would keep Trump short of the requisite number of delegates, forcing a scramble for support at an open convention. But a sense of inevitability began to build within the past few weeks for Trump, as he dominated in New York’s primary and then in contests throughout the Northeast.

Ted Cruz is right about Trump’s New York values

David Marcus, The Federalist

Cruz is right. Trump has, and in his own words is, a product of, New York values. Most of us who live in New York, even conservatives, share and have pride in these values. But then again, most of us never expect to be the Republican nominee for president of the United States.

GOP Establishment Senators Would Back Trump if Nominee

Alexander Bolton, The Hill

Trump has become a headache for Republican leaders in Washington, who question his electability but won’t criticize him publicly because he’s popular with the base and they fear he may wage a third-party bid. Still, even GOP senators who have been at the wrong end of the Republican frontrunner’s barbs say they’ll back him if he becomes their nominee.