campaign finance laws

Did Lisa Bloom Break Campaign Finance Laws by Arranging Pay for Trump Accusers?

Kathryn Blackhurst, Lifezette

Lisa Bloom’s efforts to arrange undisclosed compensation during the 2016 presidential campaign for women accusing President Donald Trump of sexual harassment may raise a host of troubling legal ethics and election law worries for the California celebrity lawyer. If political action committees and donors connected with 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton helped fund the compensation, attorney Mark J. Fitzgibbons warned it would be "very troubling from a legal ethics perspective."

Tea party Fumes Over Campaign Finance Plan

Tarini Parti & Anna Palmer, Politico

Tea party activists attacked a campaign finance rider in the $1.1 trillion CRomnibus that they view as a sneaky power grab by estab. R's designed to undermine outside conservative groups. Ken Cuccinelli says 'the new limits only increase political speech for party insiders.' 

GOP Blocks Dems’ Push to Rewrite 1st Amend. Campaign Spending

Stephen Dinan, Washington Times

A Dem. election year push led by Harry Reid to amend the Constitution and roll back campaign-spending free speech rights ran out of steam Thurs. and fell victim to a Senate filibuster. “This is an attack on the First Amendment’s most important protection,” said Sen. Mike Lee.

Walker: Media Looking at Campaign Probe Backwards

Mario Trujillo, The Hill

Gov. Scott Walker (R) insisted that the criminal investigation against him has already been dismissed. Prosecutors accuse Walker and his aides of a concerted effort to sidestep campaign finance laws and illegally coordinating with outside groups.

Citizens United's Bossie: Ruling Protects Personal Rights

Aaron Stern, NewsMax

The left argues that these two rulings have overly empowered wealthy individuals, and particularly conservative causes. Liberals have their own super-rich donors — donors that helped propel Obama to the presidency — and a consistently huge corporate donor in labor unions.

SCOTUS Ruling Could Cost Dems the Senate

Joe Saunders, Biz Pac Review

The U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling Weds. striking down some limits on individual campaign spending won’t just affect a small group of wealthy donors. It could also help Repub. efforts to take the Senate. That means it will affect everybody – no matter how much money you have.