foreign policy

On Syria Donald Trump Finally Acts Like President Trump

Washington’s overall objective should be to bring peace to America, not micro-manage other nations’ conflicts. Washington policymakers come up with long lists of objectives which are not worth the cost, in this case essentially permanent war. Withdrawal from Syria is long overdue.

Forever Nipping at His Heels

George Neumayr, The American Spectator

Normally, liberals would cut a non-interventionist president some slack on a dubiously obtained Vietnam-era medical deferment. Not Trump. His withdrawal of troops from unwinnable conflicts and his overtures to enemies leave liberals decidedly unimpressed. Suddenly, they have turned hawkish — they now favor a perpetual presence in the Middle East — and forbid dialogue with dictators. Earlier this year they told us with great confidence that Trump’s irenic North Korean policy would empower Chairman Kim and loose him upon the world. Never mind that the North Korean crisis has disappeared from discussion for months. Where did it go?

Who Lost the World George H.W. Left Behind?

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

The establishment won the great political battles before 2016. But how did the democracy crusaders, globalists, open borders progressives and interventionists do by their country in these decades? Did the former presidents who sat beside Trump at National Cathedral, and the establishment seated in the pews behind them, realize that it was their policies, their failures, that gave birth to the new America that rose up to throw them out, and put in Donald Trump?

Elizabeth Warren goes first on foreign policy and serves as a warning to the rest

Editors, Washington Examiner

In the face of the threats we face from states such as China, Iran, North Korea, and Russia, this is not a good moment to cut defense spending. Warren has at least put a foreign policy outlook on the table for others to pick over. For that, she deserves a lot of credit. But her foray into this topic should serve as a warning to other Democrats that they're going to have to do better, and that that might not be so easy to do if they intend to keep their left-wing base happy.

The Trump Doctrine

President Trump’s remarks at the UN were noteworthy, not so much for their radical departure from the interventionist policies of the two Bush presidents, and their rejection of the weakness and globalism of Obama, but for their return to the principles of George Washington.

Death of a Patriot

William Murchison, The American Spectator

There seems ample room to debate the wisdom of this American intervention or that one without discarding the overriding wisdom that projection of national strength warns the screwballs and America-haters to keep their distance. Because if they don’t, you know what? They’ll run eventually, and head-long, into the heirs of John McCain — lovers, like him, of freedom; imitators of his worthy example; telling foreign enemies, in McCain-like tones of defiance, just where they can get off.

America’s Growing Enemies List

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

How many quarrels, conflicts and wars, and with how many adversaries, can even the mighty United States sustain? A list of America’s adversaries here would contain the Taliban, the Houthis of Yemen, Bashar Assad of Syria, Erdogan’s Turkey, Iran, North Korea, Russia and China—a pretty full plate. Are we prepared to see these confrontations through, to assure the capitulation of our adversaries? What do we do if they continue to defy us? And if it comes to a fight, how many allies will we have in the battles and wars that follow?

Trump’s foreign policy is actually boosting America’s standing

Michael Goodwin, New York Post

Numerous signs are popping up that the impact of Trump’s policies is far from the disastrous scenario the media predict. By wielding America’s power instead of apologizing for it, and by keeping his focus on jobs and national security, Trump is making progress in fixing the ruinous status quo he inherited. America First, it turns out, is more than a slogan. It is a road map to reshaping America’s relationship with friend and foe alike.

Trump Stays Defiant Amid a Foreign Policy Establishment Gone Mad

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

This Helsinki hysteria is but a taste. By cheering Brexit, dissing the EU, suggesting NATO is obsolete, departing Syria, trying to get on with Putin, Trump is threatening the entire U.S. foreign policy establishment with what it fears most: irrelevance. For if there is no war on, no war imminent, and no war wanted, what does a War Party do?

Reciprocity Is the Method to Trump’s Madness

Victor Davis Hanson, National Review

Trump’s entire foreign policy can be summed up as a demand for symmetry from all partners and allies, and tit-for-tat replies to would-be enemies. Did Trump have to be so loud and often crude in his effort to bully America back to reciprocity? Who knows? But it seems impossible to imagine that globalist John McCain, internationalist Barack Obama, or gentlemanly Mitt Romney would ever have called Europe, NATO, Mexico, and Canada to account, or warned Iran or North Korea that tit would be met by tat.

Trump's diplomatic belligerence

Editors, Washington Examiner

Trump, when he talks about international relations, sometimes goes too far. But when he grumbles about allies “taking advantage” of us, he is not wrong. It is true that in NATO and other international institutions America is generally the boss, and it would be folly to demolish or abandon these institutions and this order. But that does not mean they are not in dire need of improvement or that it is not time to try methods of persuasion tougher than those deployed in the past. Trump is applying pressure to our allies to hold them accountable, to make the alliances work. Sometimes that involves being a bit brusque.

The Establishment Hearts China

Steven J. Allen, American Greatness

China is a totalitarian police state that tortures and jails dissidents and seeks to intimidate anyone who gets in its way. It’s killed more of its own people than any other government, ever. But many members of the American establishment see China as a partner, a role model, and the wave of the future. They believe that, instead of fighting the Communists, we should work with them and emulate them. The arguments against democracy by many of our opinion leaders and industrialists sound as if they were crafted by Chinese Communists? Great fools think alike, I suppose.

Burma Lurches Back Toward Ethnic and Religious Conflict

The Trump administration doesn’t appear to be paying attention, let alone seeking a solution, to the increasing conflict. For Burma much depends on the government ending its multi-front war on its own people. Unfortunately, the West has few good options concerning Burma.

Trump's New Foreign Policy: The Cooptation Doctrine

Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

The Cooptation Doctrine -- Sanction the hell out of the leader of a despotic Third World country, then go meet him and promise, if he mends his ways, to make his country rich and him even richer. Trump realizes instinctually what we all know from history. Ideology be damned -- being a communist dictator is all about making a fortune off the backs of "the people."  (Castro died a billionaire).  Of course, it helps that you place the despot's regime under those extreme sanctions before you offer him paradise and not let up with those sanctions until he relents and signs.

Trump Could Be One of America's Great Foreign Policy Presidents

David P. Goldman, PJ Media

Liberal media is aghast at the president's rough handling of Canadian boy-band frontman Justin Trudeau, and his confrontational approach overall at the Group of Seven summit. When the dust settles, though, Trump may accomplish what eluded Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama: a stabler and safer world without the need for millions of American boots on the ground. He well may go down in history as one of our great foreign policy presidents. It's not in the bag, but it is within sight.

When it comes to the international chess game, Trump is a master

Charlie Kirk, The Hill

Donald Trump stepped straight into the Oval office as a titan of industry. He is now operating U.S. foreign policy as he would his business enterprise. He is maximizing the value of the U.S. brand. He is boldly stepping into new markets. He is looking at lost markets and deciding how to regain them. He is figuring out which are his non-productive divisions and jettisoning them.

Trump's His Own Good Cop/Bad Cop—and That's Good

Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

Trump has taken his flexible approach to new heights by being his own one-man good cop/bad cop, alternately vilifying and coaxing, even buttering up, his adversaries, often at what appears to be a dizzying pace. The press is ever eager to attack him for this (as they are for everything else), but as of now, his technique seems to be working.  He communicates with Kim Jong-un and North Korea’s leadership as a person, not as some executive branch/State Department construct, spouting the hoary rhetoric of diplomacy.

Trump inherits Reagan's wind

Charles Hurt, Washington Times

Mr. Trump is a stunning departure from all his predecessors back to Reagan. Drawing rebuke and scorn, Reagan refused to live in a world that accepted Mutual Assured Destruction as a normal existence. He vowed to change that. A nuclear Korean peninsula with missiles aimed at our Western cities has long become a new accepted norm. But not to Mr. Trump. Same with Iran, radical Islamic terrorism and illegal immigration streaming across our border with Mexico. Like Mr. Trump, Reagan’s top priority was to Make America Great Again.

Stop Supporting Saudi Arabia in its War on the Yemeni People

The U.S. is at war in Yemen. Special Forces are on the ground in Saudi Arabia, while Washington is providing Riyadh’s military with munitions, targeting assistance, and aerial refueling. All to bomb a nation whose people have done nothing against Americans.

Saved by our bold disrupter

Michael Goodwin, New York Post

Trump’s approach to national security leverages America’s strengths instead of being paralyzed by potential pitfalls. He is not, like his predecessor, “leading from behind” or doing nothing under the guise of “strategic patience.” Instead, he is proving to be the same bold disrupter on the international stage that he is in domestic politics. Trump's message is: We stick with our friends, and we stick it to those who would do us harm.