House memo

From Publishing the Pentagon Papers to Suppressing the Nunes Memo

George Neumayr, The American Spectator

It all depends on whose ox is being gored, of course. If the release of government secrets hurts Republicans or some cherished conservative cause, journalists support it. If the release hurts Democrats or some cherished liberal cause, they oppose it. Daniel Ellsberg, good. Devin Nunes, bad. But unlike Ellsberg, Nunes has broken no laws. No matter; the media will treat him as a traitor while exonerating real ones.

Naming Names Is Mandatory in the House Intelligence Memo

Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

The current House investigation into the activities of the FBI is of paramount, even epoch, importance -- way beyond the brain-deadening partisanship that seems to be engulfing the discussion.  Everyone, no matter the party, no matter the belief, even if they are foolish enough not to realize it, will be at risk at one time or another from the titanic (and anonymous) technological capabilities of government.

If the GOP memo is as advertised we’ll see the deep state at its most frightening

Judge Andrew P. Napolitano, Fox News

Where is the personal courage on the House Intelligence Committee? Where is the patriotism? Where is the fidelity to the Constitution? The government exists by our consent. It derives its powers from us. We have a right to know what it has done in our names, who broke our trust, who knew about it, who looked the other way and why and by whom all this was intentionally hidden until after Congress voted to expand FISA.