media bias

The Democrats’ Delusions Drive The Trump Impeachment Narrative

Democrats have convinced themselves that Donald Trump’s election was fraud, not a revolution against the Leftwing establishment consensus in Washington. So, while the narrative has shifted from Russian collusion to real or imagined campaign finance violations, the underlying concept that Donald Trump was “fraudulently” elected President hasn’t shifted at all.

Mark Meadows For White House Chief Of Staff

The most important job President Trump’s next Chief of Staff has is not making the trains run on time – it is making the trains deliver on President Trump’s agenda to ensure his reelection. Priebus and Kelly both failed in that important part of the job, Mark Meadows is the only name that has surfaced who can deliver on it in the face of a hostile Nancy Pelosi-led Congress.

Crenshaw vs. Liberal Panic on Press Freedom

L. Brent Bozell III and Tim Graham, CNS News

Those on the left have been ranting for years now that the press can't allow Trump to be "normalized" — in other words, the media must always behave as if an election-stealing dictator is sitting in the White House. For the left, there is no universal morality. There are the idealistic leftists who must be celebrated, and there are the Cynical, Lying Bad Guys who must be destroyed. Dan Crenshaw exposed how much civility is limited when it comes to conservatives.

Corrupt Democrats Are Not 'News'

L. Brent Bozell III and Tim Graham, CNS News

When seeking to demonstrate the degree to which the "objective" news media act like Democratic partisans, the best place to start is scandals, as in "Have you heard all about the latest Republican scandal?" versus "What Democrat scandal?" Think of this, and then feel free to laugh at NBC's Chuck Todd, who proclaimed on Sunday's "Meet the Press" that charges of a liberal bias in the media are an old Roger Ailes tactic "not based in much fact."

If You Want To Know Why Conservatives Don’t Trust Media, Watch CNN

David Harsanyi, The Federalist

It’s one thing to deny the embedded bias of political media—the left-ideological framing, skewed focus, and prejudiced coverage that’s forced conservatives to consume news through a filter for decades—and it’s another to ignore a bias that’s transforming into unethical advocacy. Suspicion of the media was restive among conservatives long before Trump and Fox News exploited it. There will always be those who distrust any news that fails to confirm their worldview. But Trump’s “fake news” hyperbole has currency with many Americans because the political media too often lives up to their worst expectations.

Liberals Hype Comedian 'Collusion'

L. Brent Bozell III and Tim Graham, CNS News

All is apparently right with the world when the networks work overtime to confirm the "effortless" coolness of Democratic leaders. But Republicans can never be normalized or humanized by late-night hosts. When Johnny Carson mocked President Ronald Reagan, it was gentle and had a "just kidding" vibe. All these years later, the left expects late-night comedians to lead a vicious campaign of character assassination to ruin Trump, which is why Fallon's hair mussing gets metaphorically reimagined as treason.

This Is Seth Meyers on Drugs

L. Brent Bozell III and Tim Graham, CNS News

When CNN's Van Jones asked how Seth Meyers can still "find the funny," Meyers was more honest about his personal Resistance: "if you can point out how insane it all is, I think that helps keep you sane and keeps bringing you back. ... If you take a few days off criticizing what the president does, I feel like maybe that means he wins, and I don't want somebody to be so abnormal and have them win by us ignoring it." Trump. Must. Lose. That is the late-night "comedy" rule. That's the only consistency.

Trump and 'The Truth'

William Murchison, The American Spectator

Media fury at one Donald Trump is sowing worrisome consequences for the future. The lying so-and-so, as most of the media view him, is going to be gone one day: possibly with the media’s invaluable assistance. And will there linger, save in progressive circles, any public inclination to believe, or even listen to, a word the anti-Trump press says about anything? Including the weather?

The Media's Year of Trump Hating

L. Brent Bozell III and Tim Graham, CNS News

Journalists often talk about President Trump's "war on the media" and can't possibly discuss the media's war on President Trump. When the president attacks the media, that's an attack on democracy. When the media undermine the president, that's the full flowering of democracy. Removing the statements made by Trump and other politicians, 90 percent of evening-news Trump evaluations were negative, and only 10 percent were positive.

The Grinchy Washington Post

L. Brent Bozell III and Tim Graham, CNS News

Liberals at the Washington Post didn't seem to have a merry Christmas this year. They were seriously unhappy about the fact that anyone would utter the "lie" about President Trump making it safe to say "merry Christmas" after eight years of the Obamas sending out White House cards wishing "happy holidays."

As the Dossier Scandal Looms, the New York Times Struggles to Save Its Collusion Tale

Andrew C. McCarthy, National Review

Seven months after throwing Carter Page as fuel on the collusion fire lit by then-FBI director James Comey’s stunning public disclosure that the Bureau was investigating possible Trump campaign “coordination” in Russia’s election meddling, the Gray Lady now says: Never mind. We’re onto Collusion 2.0, in which it is George Papadopoulos — then a 28-year-old whose idea of résumé enhancement was to feign participation in the Model U.N. — who triggered the FBI’s massive probe by . . . wait for it . . . a night of boozy blather in London.

Big media’s sad and extremely horrible week

Wesley Pruden, Washington Times

The corrections, reflections, and over-the-top hand-wringing are set out now in everyone’s eye, thanks to a media dishing it out to everyone with a smartphone or a laptop. It’s often not very pretty. The hand-wringers in the newsrooms, complaining that nobody loves them anymore, should worry less about what their critics say about them and spend more time learning their craft. An editor steeped in the art of head-pounding would have told them that.

'Hurtling' GOP tax bills are actually serious

Michael Barone, Washington Examiner

It’s not clear whether Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., can round up the needed 50 Senate votes and, if he does, whether a conference committee will hammer out a version that can pass both houses. In any case, the Republican tax bills are something more serious and responsible than “hurtling” missiles “tilting” the tax code toward the “wealthy.”

When Racial Hoaxes Make News

L. Brent Bozell III and Tim Graham, CNS News

In the angst-ridden aftermath of Donald Trump's election, the media found vindication by reporting all kinds of "hate crime" incidents, lurching so eagerly that they fell for a few that turned out to be hoaxes. Any media outlet that leaps on a small incident of vandalism as a grand statement on Where America Stands ought to have the courage to make a public acknowledgment when the story is fraudulent. To do otherwise is to stoke racial fires with dishonesty.

How Media Toasts Hurt the GOP Establishment

L. Brent Bozell III and Tim Graham, CNS News

Corruption, in the eyes of our partisan media, is solely a Trump problem, just like colluding with Russia to manipulate the election, or hating facts you find inconvenient. When Republicans agreeably proclaim that only Trump is ruining Washington on all of these things, they are trapped in the liberal-media mind meld.

James O’Keefe Busts YouTube Deciding What Is ‘Legitimate’ News, and What Isn’t

Joel B. Pollak, Breitbart

James O’Keefe’s Project Veritas has released a follow-up to its exposé of bias at the New York Times earlier this week. This time, the target is YouTube, the ubiquitous video-sharing platform owned by technology giant Google.

The Media: Any Stick Will Do Against Trump

George Neumayr, The American Spectator

Nothing pleases journalists more than when Republicans do their propagandistic work for them. They like the construction, “some critics say,” but they like the phrase “some Republicans say” even more when they need to smear a reviled target. With Trump, the sticks grow ever more thin, but the media can always count on me-too Republicans and conservatives to sharpen what little remains of them.

CNN’s Big Secret -- journalists really don't like Trump

James Freeman, Wall Street Journal

CNN host Brian Stelter said, "President Trump’s actions and inactions in the wake of Charlottesville are provoking some uncomfortable conversations, mostly off the air if we’re being honest." There is certainly a question of just how uncomfortable CNN has been about raising issues related to President Trump’s health and character. “My impression is that since President Trump’s inauguration, there’s been a lot of tiptoeing going on,” added Brian Stelter.

President Trump’s Arizona Speech Drives Left Nuts

Trump’s Phoenix speech was good mostly because Trump showed he could still be Trump, and that he wasn’t going to be cowed into abandoning his base – and because along the way he delivered an epic put down to the national media’s Charlottesville narrative.

Jim Acosta Can't Handle the Facts

L. Brent Bozell III and Tim Graham, CNS News

When (Trump aide Stephen) Miller was done, (CNN reporter Jim) Acosta complained, "You called me ignorant on national television." The Washington Post "fact-checker" squad must have agonized as it underlined Acosta as the ignorant half of this exchange. If it did, kudos to the Washington Post for breaking the mold.