Neil Gorsuch

100 Days of Trump: Conservatives seek return of the 2016 version of Donald Trump

Is it too much to ask for the Donald Trump of 2016 to come back and bust up Washington? Plus, Another outrageous ruling by a liberal judge could bring out the “old” Trump, and, After nearly 100 days the press is still wondering what’s ‘wrong’ with Melania Trump.

Gorsuch Lessons for Trump’s Next Nominee

Fred Barnes, Wall Street Journal

Mr. McConnell expresses confidence. If a second Supreme Court vacancy arises, he said in an interview shortly after Mr. Gorsuch’s confirmation, “I think we are going to see a quality nominee.” The list is brimming with them, conservatives all, with a political machine eager to get behind them.

Gorsuch Asks The Right Questions

Asking the right questions doesn’t mean that Justice Gorsuch will reach the right decisions in these or any future case before the Court.  However, conservatives can take encouragement that Justice Gorsuch is starting from the plain language of the Constitution and the statues Congress has passed, not the whims and fantasies of other judges.

Nixon, LBJ, and the First Shots in the Judges’ War

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

The Democrats’ drive to defeat Neil Gorsuch is the latest battle in a 50-year war for control of the Supreme Court—a war that began with a conspiracy against Richard Nixon by Chief Justice Earl Warren, Justice Abe Fortas, and Lyndon Johnson. Behind the hostility to the mild-mannered and decent Neil Gorsuch lies the same malevolence that lynched Clement Haynsworth.

The Stupid Party Finally Gets Smart on the Court

Daniel J. Flynn, The American Spectator

The GOP learned, not just from Republican failures but from Democrat obstructionism, particularly regarding the conservative nominees of Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan. Trading Miers for Samuel Alito and Garland for Gorsuch looks a lot like the deals Red Auerbach once pulled on hayseed general managers throughout the NBA.

Gorsuch vote finally gives GOP Congress a win

Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner

After spending weeks on an ill-fated effort to pass a long-promised healthcare bill, Congress will at last able to check off a critical promise made during the campaign by Republicans and President Trump: putting a solid conservative on the bench to replace the late Antonin Scalia.