The change in tone in Sean Spicer's White House press briefing is a very important piece of trail craft that tells us Priebus’ influence is waning and that the Ryancare disaster has shown just how out of his depth the White House Chief of Staff is, given that his primary qualification for the job was his long home state relationship with Speaker Paul Ryan.

Our friend Michael Patrick Leahy has shown that there’s more than willful blindness behind the bizarre rulings against President Trump's Executive Orders on travel from terrorism hotspots. There’s a potential conspiracy involving Democrat holdovers at the Department of Homeland Security, Muslim sympathizers in the media and the shadowy “immigrant rights” groups and Democratic state Attorneys General that have brought the lawsuits to overturn the President’s Executive Order.

The gnat-ish Democrats can’t prevail unless the Republicans let them win. Plus, This time it’s the Democrats who are hopelessly divided on a headlining issue, and, Trump can and must use his bully pulpit to help people out of Democrat dependency.

The behavior of Rep. Adam Schiff and other Democrat members of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence isn’t caused by their purported outrage at the phony allegations of Russian “hacking” of the 2016 election; it is merely the latest episode in a long running series of Democrats politicizing leaks and using secret intelligence to discredit their political opponents.

The notion that an unelected federal judge could order the President and Congress to admit a given number of foreigners and order the States to support with welfare and education benefits however many refugees a private organization chose to send them defies so many constitutional limits that it is hard to even begin to count them.

The Ryancare fiasco demonstrates how not to pass a bill. What now for Trump and the GOP? Plus, The way forward: Get back to the table, hammer something out, make it work, and, With Ryancare now in the trashcan, time to retrain the rhetorical guns on the real enemy.

CHQ Exclusives

The change in tone in Sean Spicer's White House press briefing is a very important piece of trail craft that tells us Priebus’ influence is waning and that the Ryancare disaster has shown just how out of his depth the White House Chief of Staff is, given that his primary qualification for the job was his long home state relationship with Speaker Paul Ryan.

Our friend Michael Patrick Leahy has shown that there’s more than willful blindness behind the bizarre rulings against President Trump's Executive Orders on travel from terrorism hotspots. There’s a potential conspiracy involving Democrat holdovers at the Department of Homeland Security, Muslim sympathizers in the media and the shadowy “immigrant rights” groups and Democratic state Attorneys General that have brought the lawsuits to overturn the President’s Executive Order.

The gnat-ish Democrats can’t prevail unless the Republicans let them win. Plus, This time it’s the Democrats who are hopelessly divided on a headlining issue, and, Trump can and must use his bully pulpit to help people out of Democrat dependency.

The behavior of Rep. Adam Schiff and other Democrat members of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence isn’t caused by their purported outrage at the phony allegations of Russian “hacking” of the 2016 election; it is merely the latest episode in a long running series of Democrats politicizing leaks and using secret intelligence to discredit their political opponents.

The notion that an unelected federal judge could order the President and Congress to admit a given number of foreigners and order the States to support with welfare and education benefits however many refugees a private organization chose to send them defies so many constitutional limits that it is hard to even begin to count them.

The Ryancare fiasco demonstrates how not to pass a bill. What now for Trump and the GOP? Plus, The way forward: Get back to the table, hammer something out, make it work, and, With Ryancare now in the trashcan, time to retrain the rhetorical guns on the real enemy.

There are many issues plumbed in these polls, but what comes through loud and clear is that, by hitching his popularity to Paul Ryan and Ryancare, President Trump has suffered a devastating drop in approval among the staunchest of his core constituents.

Conservatives are getting next to nothing in the #Ryancare bill. It’s time for conservatives and for President Trump to take his own deal making advice and walk away from this disaster – there are better deals available and the price of giving illegal aliens taxpayer subsidized health care is way too high. We urge CHQ readers to contact House Freedom Caucus members to urge them to stand tall against bullying from establishment Republican Speaker Paul Ryan.

Not even GOP leaders are dumb enough to “deal” with Democrats on the Gorsuch nomination. Plus, Trump and Obama haven’t spoken since January 20 and the media thinks it’s weird, and, Media still implying Trump is only helping the economy to enrich himself.

The House votes today on #Ryancare. In his desperation to maintain federal government control of the health insurance and health care markets establishment Republican Speaker Paul Ryan is turning more and more to the ugly corruption of the Democrats’ former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. We urge CHQ readers to contact their Representative to demand they vote NO on this corrupt disaster.

In going to the extreme in opposing Neil Gorsuch Democrats are searching for rock bottom. Plus, What will the repercussions be for the Republicans who vote for Ryancare?, and, To have higher quality public debate America needs higher quality and relevant education.

Here’s hoping all of that information about the mess of Obamacare Rep. David Schweikert has shared over the years inspires him to keep his promise to not support measures that do not successfully and smartly repeal and replace the worst health care bill in history.

Front Page Headlines

  • Victor Davis Hanson, National Review

    From Russia’s point of view, considering their strategic and economic interests, a pliable Obama 2.0 would have been far better than Trump, with his pro-oil-and-gas domestic agenda, his promised defense buildup, and his unpredictable Jacksonian promises to help friends and hurt enemies.

  • George Neumayr, The American Spectator

    Both Brennan and officials in the Baltic States had strong incentives to help Hillary and hurt Trump. That Brennan and some Baltic spies teamed up to inflate the significance of some half-baked intelligence from a recording isn’t surprising. Only in such a feverish partisan milieu would basic questions go unasked, such as: Is it really a good idea to investigate a political opponent on the basis of a lead provided by a country that wants to see him lose?

  • Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

    Why would Schumer squander his political capital by denying a quality candidate like Judge Gorsuch a vote? Does he also think that a collapsing Obamacare—even its backers believe is in need of corrective surgery—will be an asset for his imperiled colleagues in 2018? The last time Democrats headed down that Radical Road and nominated George McGovern, they lost 49 states.

  • Stephen Moore, Investor's Business Daily

    Government, by its nature, is not compassionate. It can't be. It is nothing other than a force. Government can only spend a dollar to help someone when it forcibly takes a dollar from someone else. At its core, government welfare is predicated on a false compassion. This isn't to say that government should never take collective action to help people. But these actions are based on compulsion, not compassion.

  • Wesley Pruden, Washington Times

    The most serious business in Washington is not what to do about Obamacare, a tax cut, the nut case in North Korea, or even how the election of Donald Trump has so polarized America that no friendship, relationship or marriage is safe. Washington worries about how to find a parking place in Obama's neighborhood.

  • Editors, Washington Examiner

    Democrats, environmentalists, and big businesses that profited from the overweening regulations will attack Trump and EPA administrator Scott Pruitt for rolling back Obama's rules. But undoing the clean power plan should be seen as a victory for the economy, for sound science, and for the rule of law.

  • Andrew C. McCarthy, National Review

    Before ISIS and al-Qaeda and the Khomeini revolution and Hezbollah and the Blind Sheikh and the Brotherhood and Khalid Masood, there was the single thing that unites them all. There was Islam. Western political and opinion elites remain willfully blind to this. They cannot help but project onto Islamic beliefs and practices their own progressive pieties — which take seriously neither religion nor the notion that there is any civilization but their own.

  • Judge Jeanine Pirro, Fox News

    I want to be clear: this is NOT on President Trump. No one expected a businessman to completely understand the nuances, the complicated ins and outs of Washington and its legislative process. How would he know which individuals upon whom he would be able to rely? Many of them, friends and establishment colleagues of Speaker Ryan. The American people won't forget this and neither should the president.

  • Alex Pfeiffer, Daily Caller

    Due to troubles in court, President Trump has not been able to effectively carry out his campaign promise to stop refugee resettlement. Since he took office, 8,476 refugees have been resettled in the U.S., according to the Refugee Processing Center. More specifically, 1,131 Syrian refugees have resettled in the country during this time. This is nearly three times the number of Syrian refugees, 395, that were resettled in the same period last year under President Obama.

  • Eric Metaxas, CNS News

    I believe even more important for Christians than being on the front lines of the culture war is participating in the culture—and better yet, helping to create and nurture it. If the main contribution that Christians make to culture is complaining about it, we’re doing something wrong.

  • Sen. Orrin Hatch, Wall Street Journal

    Whatever Democrats' motivation—be it the outcome of President Obama’s lame-duck nomination during last year’s election, an unwillingness to accept the November results, or the desire for judges to push a liberal political agenda—they have apparently decided to wage a desperate, scorched-earth campaign to derail this nomination, no matter the damage they inflict along the way. We are now watching the confirmation process through the funhouse mirror.

  • Byron York, Washington Examiner

    The Obamacare train wreck was a failure for President Trump and a disaster for House Republicans. That is, it was worse for Republicans, because they had been at it for so long, but it was plenty bad for Trump. When Speaker Paul Ryan pulled the GOP repeal-and-replace bill Friday afternoon, he said, "We will need time to reflect on how we got to this moment." Here are 14 things to think about.

  • Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

    So far, the Russia-connection investigation has proven a dry hole. But an investigation into who in the FBI, CIA, or NSA is unmasking U.S. citizens and criminally leaking information to a Trump-hating press to destroy a president they are sworn to serve could prove to be a gusher. What did Barack Obama know, and when did he know it?

  • Andrew C. McCarthy, National Review

    Neither Comey nor Nunes has addressed the two central questions: (1) Did the Obama administration take active steps to capture communications of Trump officials, whether by particularized FISA warrant or by intentionally exploiting their “incidental” intelligence-collection authority? And (2) if such active steps were taken, was it in connection with a good-faith suspicion of collusion in Russian sabotage, or was it Watergate-style political spying?

  • Editors, Washington Examiner

    Thursday, when Ryan wanted the House to pass the bill, was the anniversary of Obamacare's passage. It was, notably, the seventh anniversary, not the eighth. That means that Trump and Ryan could take 364 days to pass this bill, and they would still be on pace. Take a week. Take a month. Take the time to write a bill that doesn't merely check a box, but that actually reforms healthcare.