Queue 'Headlines'

  • Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

    The Pelosi factor has been a drag on Democrats in all four of the special elections the party has lost since Trump’s November triumph. Prediction: Democrats will not go into the 2018 Congressional elections with San Fran Nan as the party’s face and future. No way. As President Kennedy said, “Sometimes party loyalty asks too much.”

  • Rich Lowry, New York Post

    Ossoff merely reflected his party’s attitude. Stopping Trump is imperative, so long as it doesn’t require the party rethinking its uncompromising stance on abortion, guns or immigration. Every old rule should be thrown out in the cause of the resistance — except the tried-and-true orthodoxies on social issues.

  • Philip Klein, Washington Examiner

    If this bill passes as written, there's very little reason to believe that the long-term spending reforms will ever see the light of day. But in the meantime, there's every reason to bet on the fact that Congress will follow through on the hundreds of billions of dollars in spending it's using to sustain Obamacare.

  • Mark Krikorian, National Review

    Obama’s fecklessness has created an MS-13 crime wave from the Long Island, N.Y., communities of Brentwood and Central Islip to Santa Maria, Calif., and in the many other communities in between where Central American teenagers were shipped. The lesson: The Obama approach of enforcing immigration law only against illegal aliens who have been convicted of violent crimes is a recipe for disaster.

  • Shermichael Singleton, The Hill

    From Kansas to Montana and Georgia to South Carolina, nothing worked for Democrats. Their strategy — or rather, lack thereof — leaves many in the Democratic party wondering where did they go wrong. And the answer is simple: it’s progressivism. Far left-leaning policies aren't registering with a majority of Americans, who still believe in themes such as tradition and small government.

  • Tony Perkins, CNS News

    If abortion groups are trying to keep a low profile, they’re not doing a very good job of it. While Congress debates whether taxpayers should fund the likes of Planned Parenthood, the industry has spent the last six months trying to avoid headlines. That will be impossible now, thanks to a federal judge who’s threatening to send the man responsible for exposing the grisly business to jail.

  • Victor Davis Hanson, National Review

    Mattis, McMaster, and Kelly must know that few other presidents would have taken the heat to entrust three military men to guide national-security policy. And even if another president did, he might not empower them with anything like their present latitude. At least for now, it is a win-win-win solution for Trump, the generals — and the country.

  • Andrew C. McCarthy, American Greatness

    Why does special counsel Mueller need 14 lawyers (and more coming) for a counterintelligence investigation, as to which the intelligence professionals—agents, not lawyers—have found no “collusion with Russia” evidence after over a year of hard work? What will those lawyers be doing with no limits on their jurisdiction, with nothing but all the time and funding they need to examine one target, Donald Trump?

  • R. Emmett Tyrrell, Jr., The American Spectator

    What separates Hodgkinson from Bill Ayers, the bomber of the Pentagon, except that Ayers tried to kill more people? The left has been on a steady evolution toward homicide like what Hodgkinson undertook last week for years, and there are a lot more Hodgkinsons out there than we care to contemplate. As long as these values dominate, and there is no mitigating alternative, the public had best be armed.

  • Monica Showalter, American Thinker

    Now the Democrats are left with a steaming pile of $23 million in campaign debt, shelling out $200 per vote, all because they thought hating on Trump was a winning strategy that would thrill the voters.  And if that isn't clear enough a message, a similar race in the 5th District of South Carolina came out the same way. The left wanted a referendum on Trump. Tuesday, they got it.

  • Charlie Martin, PJ Media

    When someone else says something, especially if you intend to report on it, carefully listen to what the other person is saying. Assume that other person is smarter than you, and try to make sense of what they're saying. Reporters should be looking for information -- that is, they should be looking for things that surprise them. If instead they just hear what fits their preconceptions, well, they're not reporting.

  • Sarah Westwood, Washington Examiner

    Trump's campaign-style rally marked a return to the forum that built his candidacy during the presidential race, one that has offered him a platform to sell his agenda during his young presidency. The president has held a handful of rallies since taking office, although most have involved more scripted remarks than the free-wheeling speeches that defined his early events. Trump now has to hope the Republicans' unbeaten streak in the competitive special congressional elections will make the difference for their shared legislative agenda.

  • Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

    They may rejoice at Trump's low poll numbers, but beware.  As the man said, it's the economy, stupid.  Their boy (and he is a boy) Ossoff lost more substantially than expected in an upscale part of Georgia elitists should win. Enough of the Trump bashing.  Start thinking about how to make the country better.  Come up with some policies that make sense. Then maybe you'll start winning again.

  • Editors, Washington Examiner

    With the massive tightening in just two years of Georgia's 6th District, along with the other too-close races where Republicans have squeaked by so far this year, the GOP has received its wake-up call. Republicans will not face such record-setting campaign spending and national attention in many other races, but they need to figure out what works and what doesn't if they expect to continue as a governing party after November 2018.

  • Holman W. Jenkins, Jr., The Wall Street Journal

    Trump's very unsuitability, the mood of the American public that elected him, the obscure impasse of American politics that brought him to power—all these signs deserve more respect than they’re getting. His Torquemadas don’t and can’t know whether our democracy, in the improbable Mr. Trump, found a lever to move us forward, but there’s something repugnant in their desire not to find out.