Confederate statues

An Alternative to Tearing Statues Down

R. Emmett Tyrrell, Jr., The American Spectator

Why not erect another monument nearby as a fitting tribute to people who did some good in the fight for desegregation in Virginia. How about raising a memorial to Mildred and Richard Loving, who in 1967 successfully challenged the miscegenation laws of the state? Mildred was black, and Richard was white. What is more they were in love. I bet you could find similar examples all over America from our supposedly sordid past.

The Knock-Down, Drag-Out Society

William Murchison, The American Spectator

The age — our age — the age of the instant accusation, the flat, declarative dismissal of the other side’s case for anything — has a style that works fine for winning elections. And pulling down other people’s memorials. For uniting, moving to a better place, fixing things, affirming life at other than the knock-down, drag-out level — well, that’s another matter. Obviously.

What Do We Say About Decent Men Who Died for a Wicked Cause?

David P. Goldman, PJ Media

The best outcome would be to defuse the issue, and hope that people can walk away from it and get back to the business of getting an education and making a living. Nothing will console Southerners for their defeat in the Civil War; nothing will compensate African-Americans for hundreds of lost years. The best anyone can do is to find a way to live with it and get on with life.

Pulling Down Confederate Statues Does Nothing to Change Society

William Murchison, The American Spectator

The American slavocracy was large; it was powerful. Among its members: George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, with their large monuments and even larger legacies. What makes Robert E. Lee a likelier target than the father of our country? This business of digging up the dead and exhibiting their shortcomings has no predictable end. Today’s heroes and heroines become fair game for great-grandkids: topics for future ridicule and disrespect. Seldom in our history — alas — has the counsel to look before you leap seemed more relevant, or more ignored, than right now.

After the Confederates, Who's Next?

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

As scholar Charles Murray has written, 97 percent of the world’s most significant figures and 97 percent of the world’s greatest achievements in the arts, architecture, literature, astronomy, biology, earth sciences, physics, medicine, mathematics and technology came from the West. What is disheartening is not that there are haters of our civilization out there, but that there seem to be fewer defenders.