national unity

US feels divisive in 9/11 aftermath as memories of unity fade

Michael Goodwin, New York Post

In some years, the images and memories are faded, as if from long, long ago. Other years, the horrors feel as fresh as when the burning towers collapsed. Yet few anniversaries of 9/11 have been as fraught with troubling emotions as today’s. From the vantage point of the 18th anniversary, it is unfortunately true that the worst day in American history forged the last great moment of national unity. The mourning and sense of common purpose that were so distinct then seem as if they happened in a different country in another century. Now our nation is not just polarized. It is fractured.

Is the American Century Over For Good?

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

In 1968, George Wallace of Alabama tore the Southern populist right out of the Democratic Party. Liberals Gene McCarthy, Robert Kennedy and George McGovern then savaged Vice President Hubert Humphrey from the left. The Grant Park rioters did the rest. Nixon, leading a minority Republican Party, had a compelling argument: "If the Democrats cannot unite their own party, how can they unite the nation?" Today, a watching world is asking: If you Americans are at war with yourselves over race, religion, morality, culture and politics, if you cannot unite yourselves, how can you unite the world?