politics

Insurrection and Violence - A Citizen’s Guide

What can you, the patriotic American who believes in constitutional liberty and the values of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness do to protect yourself, your family and our country? One answer to that complex question is to download and read the free “Insurrection and Violence - A Citizen’s Guide” and then follow the advice they have assembled from experienced and proven analysts on intelligence, crime, politics, revolutionary warfare, history, survival, and trauma medicine.

Welcome to Maoist America

Roger L. Simon, The Epoch Times

This American cultural revolution began decades ago on our campuses and in our media. Now it is taking over our streets. Viewpoint diversity is a thing of the past with faculty meetings morphing into our own versions of Maoist “struggle sessions,” teachers and professors first shutting their mouths if they disagree, then exercising what amounts to “self-criticism” to save their jobs or just to gain some peace. Students have gotten the message, writing their papers and editing their classroom speech in a manner not to offend the politically correct faculty, administration, and fellow students that surround them.

Across the Wide, Growing American Divide

Victor Davis Hanson, PJ Media

Red- and blue-state America was already divided before the coronavirus epidemic hit. Is there any agreement between them? Perhaps. Red-staters are not flocking to blue-state urban corridors, where the virus hit hardest. They are happy to live in less crowded places, have detached homes, and be free of government edicts that often make little sense other than to showcase the dictatorial powers of petty bureaucrats and local officials. Even blue-staters are beginning to see their mass transit, high-rise living, and clogged streets more as incubators of disease than as the circulatory system of an exciting, high-end life.

Oh Good, We’re Doing The Civility Thing Again

Kurt Schlichter, Townhall

The big problem with the idea of “civility” is that the people honestly advocating it do not understand that real civility can exist only after victory. It is a construct that allows people to work together on contentious issues only after the really contentious issues – like who will be impoverished, enslaved and/or killed – are solved. Civility is not an end in and of itself. Rather, it is a means to facilitate the functioning of a civil society. So, spare us tiresome demands for unilateral rhetorical disarmament. If you want “civility,” you need a society where the left has been crushed. Until then...

As virus rages, leaders keep dodging blame

Byron York, Washington Examiner

What is clear now is that more than a few officials around the country were slow to act. And some of them in high positions -- not as high as President of the United States, but quite powerful -- are reluctant to admit it. Take House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. She has said that the president's downplaying of coronavirus has cost American lives. It would be reasonable to argue that this time is no time to discuss blame. But anyone listening to the national conversation knows that horse is long out of the barn. At some point, amid never-ending discussions of President Trump's alleged culpability, the conversation will turn to some prominent Democrats, as well.

Citizen Legislator: Mr. Coburn goes to Washington

Charles Hurt, Washington Times

Dr. Tom Coburn never held a leadership position. He was never a committee chairman. He learned the rules of the House and the Senate and used those rules to chip away at the federal Leviathan. Certainly, he was an agonizing thorn in the side of Republican leadership. Yet even Republican Leader Mitch McConnell realized Dr. Coburn’s genius, saying that his nickname “Dr. No” failed to fully capture him. Dr. Coburn “did not let his strong principles sideline him from creative policymaking or bipartisan cooperation,” Mr. McConnell said. “Tom’s convictions did not drive him away from the table. They inspired him to become a central player.”

'Oscars 2020' parades Hollywood's contempt for everyday Americans

Tammy Bruce, Washington Times

The ratings came in for the Oscars Awards Show, Hollywood's annual ritual of back-slapping and self-congratulations. For anyone in Hollywood or the entertainment industry who remained confident that America still cared, they had another thing coming. The lack of a desire by the normals to be subjected to what immediately became another three hours of the woke lecturing by the rich and smug impacted the ratings. Attacks on Mr. Trump are expected, but the night’s sanctimony was targeting those the new Hollywood has always held in contempt — their own audience. Ratings of award shows tell a story of who and what America is choosing — and the establishment will get an undeniable confirmation of that on Nov. 3.

When Actors Play Scientist on Capitol Hill

L. Brent Bozell III and Tim Graham, CNS News

On Nov. 19 the House Oversight and Reform subcommittee on environment called upon the Bernie Sanders-backing actor Mark Ruffalo to testify on perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl chemicals, or "PFAS." These chemicals are used for many everyday uses. But these chemicals have leached into soil and water and air, and they show up in the bloodstream. So there's a real policy debate there. But Ruffalo doesn't have a college degree in chemistry. He doesn't have a college degree in anything. He has only played scientist Dr. Bruce Banner ("The Hulk") in the "Avengers" movies. Ruffalo's real credential for House Democrats is his socialist ideology. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Rashida Tlaib were gushing over Ruffalo in this hearing.

A Quest for American Unity

Christopher C. Hull, Ph.D., Real Clear Policy

To reunite behind the American project as originally construed, conservatives must set themselves as a movement to downsizing and defeating the worst elements of both the alt-Left and alt-Right, and to uniting Republicans, Democrats, and Independents of good will against both — and for America’s fundamental principles. By bringing together the leading lights of conservatism under an intellectual banner that broadly binds them, and providing a platform for thoughtful debate about our political tradition, the American Project is putting into practice the principle that ought to guide our politics today: E pluribus unum.

Democrats: Exploiting Massacres for Political Gain

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

If Democrats believe about Trump what their candidates say about him — that he is a white nationalist racist and xenophobe deliberately stoking fear, hatred and violence, whose words and actions call to mind the fascist Italy of Benito Mussolini and Third Reich of Nazi Germany — how can the Democratic leadership credibly not try to impeach him? Yet, blaming the massacre in El Paso on the rhetoric of Donald Trump is a charge that can come back to bite his attackers. Neither the right nor left has a monopoly on political extremism or violence. And the hate-filled rhetoric of the left this last weekend exceeds anything used by Trump.

Partisan Gerrymandering: Courts Should Keep Out of the Debate

Hans A. Von Spakovsky and Michael Watson, National Review

The allocation of representatives in a state legislature or in the U.S. House of Representatives is a fundamental political question that cannot be resolved without political considerations. Democrats know this, which is why they are demanding major revisions to the way elections are held for the U.S. House of Representatives in their H.R. 1 bill — major revisions they could exploit to increase their political power. Funny, they never complained about partisan redistricting that favored the Democrat party when they controlled a majority of state legislatures. Claims that this or that system for drawing the boundary lines of state and congressional districts is “nonpolitical” are a myth.

Bye-bye, 2018 —The Year of Living Hatefully

Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

Calling 2018 The Year of Living Hatefully (or, perhaps more accurately, living in or through hate) is but the culmination of a trend that has been going on for many years. There is and has been an emptiness in American society and I am going to suggest a cause I never thought I would, not because it is unique to me -- it hardly is -- but because I have, until relatively recently, been a rather typical agnostic of my generation. It is the absence of God, augmented by the ongoing secularization of our culture largely perpetrated by that same generation (mine).

Political Détente? Not Likely

William Murchison, The American Spectator

Provocation leads to provocation, and in a straight, unvarying line to Donald John Trump. The invective that Democrats, and some Republicans, hurl his way produces… Tweets and juttings of the presidential jaw. What else might we expect? That the finger-snappers and foot-stompers of the political word are going to bring us peace on earth, good will toward men? Not without a little encouragement from the voters they’re not.

The Supreme Court Has Been Making Policy

Jay Cost, National Review

Did the Founders intend that the choice of a Supreme Court nominee would be one of the most lasting and consequential decisions any president could make? No! The president has (or at least, should have) substantially bigger fish to fry. But both the Senate and the president have found themselves deeply enmeshed in these matters because the nomination of a Supreme Court justice is the only means of control the public has over the policymaking powers of the Court.

Make Politics Local for the Fourth of July

Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

It would be nice if, for the Fourth, we put a zipper on yelling at each other for a while. We've got the greatest country in the history of the world to live in, bar none, even with all the problems  we are bombarded with on an hourly basis. The economy's roaring. Unemployment's rock bottom, even for minorities. How about a little gratefulness for a change?

Don't Politicize Sports and Entertainment

L. Brent Bozell III and Tim Graham, CNS News

Sports leagues like the NFL and liberal sports networks like ESPN have been completely at odds with what their viewers want, and their ratings reflect it. Perhaps they could stare at these poll results and heed this warning before they lose a large chunk of Americans for good.

If ESPN Continues to Pick Sides, So Will Fans

Tony Perkins, CNS News

New network president James Pitaro said "there is going to continue to be an intersection between sports and politics, and we’re going to continue to cover that. We’re going to cover it fairly and honestly. But we are focused on serving the sports fan.” The NBA and NCAA had a taste of that pain in ticket sales when it pulled out of states with common-sense privacy laws. If ESPN continues to pick sides, you can rest assured – so will fans.

Why liberals root against America

Stephen Moore, Washington Times

It’s one thing to root against Mr. Trump and his policies and tweets when you’re in the opposition party. But in watching their behavior and listening to their whining, it is hard not to believe that to bring Mr. Trump down, they are rooting against American workers, our safety, security and general prosperity. Many on the left are suffering from a severe case of anti-Trump derangement syndrome. ATDS sufferers crave bad news. In a bright sunny economic sky, they point to the single cloud. This is why Nancy Pelosi could only sniff that the bonuses workers are getting from the tax cut are “crumbs.”

Number of Married Couples With Kids Hit 56-Year Low

Terence P. Jeffrey, CNS News

According to the national exit poll for the 2016 election, married voters picked Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton 52 percent to 44 percent. Unmarried voters picked Clinton over Trump 55 percent to 37 percent. If you were seeking to advance the causes that Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton advanced in this country, you would hope that the trends that are moving people away from lifelong marriage and responsible parenthood would continue.

Voting Booths and Stables

William Murchison, The American Spectator

Politics matters — up to a point. The transformational aspects of the Christian gospel — lions lying down with lambs, and such like, and the quest for “righteousness, godliness, faith, love, patience, meekness,” as commended by St. Paul — appear to deserve more recognition than congressional majorities and the alignment of voter blocs. Of course, when you say as much you’re talking to human beings; and we know what’s wrong with human beings, don’t we?