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Now We Know What Those Six Battalions Of Red Chinese Special Operators Are Here For

Two weeks ago in our article Six Battalions of the Red Chinese Army Have Crossed into the United States we passed along information from our friend Sam Faddis documenting the vast number of citizens of Communist China that have entered the United States illegally over the past year.

Mr. Faddis reported according to CBP data Border Patrol agents encountered more than 4,200 illegal aliens from Communist China between October 2022 and February 2023, compared to roughly 1,900 in all of fiscal year 2022.


According to Red Chinese sources PLA Special Operations units vary in size from 100 to 1000 personnel. A Department of Defense report, issued more than 20-years ago, suggests "[T]he development of the PLA’s special operations capability merits greater attention in the coming years."


The number of Communist Chinese illegal entries (that we know about) works out to be about the same as six battalions of Red Chinese Special Forces.


So, what would six battalions of Communist Chinese Special Forces be up to if they were in the United States?


Well, one thing according to a report published yesterday (May 31, 2023) in USA Today, is posing as tourists but suspected of being spies for Red China, who have made several attempts in recent years to gain access to military facilities in Alaska, a vast state studded with sensitive bases.


Tom Vanden Brook reported in one incident, a vehicle with Chinese citizens blew past a security checkpoint at Fort Wainwright in Fairbanks, several soldiers told USA TODAY. The vehicle was eventually stopped, and a search found a drone inside the vehicle. The occupants claimed they were tourists who had gotten lost.


Many of the encounters have been chalked up to innocent mistakes by foreign visitors intent on viewing the Northern Lights and other attractions in Alaska, officials say. Other attempts to enter U.S. military bases, however, seem to be probes to learn about U.S. military capabilities in Alaska, according to multiple soldiers familiar with the incidents but who were not authorized to speak publicly about them.


Not everyone who appears to be a tourist in Alaska, is, in fact a tourist, one Army officer said. Instead, they are foreign spies.


In recent years, there have been other intrusions at military bases in the Lower 48 states as well.


In 2019, a federal judge sentenced a Chinese student to a year in prison for illegally taking photos at Naval Air Station Key West in Florida. His lawyer said Zhao Qianli, 20, was just a tourist who had gotten lost, according to the Associated Press. But the naval base, where F-35 pilots train, is not a tourist hotspot. It is clearly marked off limits, and Zhao's camera and cellphone had only photos from the air station.


Details about the incidents remain mostly classified, reported Mr. Vanden Brook. However, military briefings and publicly available information lay out why the Chinese government would be interested in Alaska where some of the Pentagon's most sophisticated military capabilities and high-end war games reside.


A key concern about intrusions on U.S. military bases may have as much to do about what is left behind than photos taken, said David Deptula, a retired three-star Air Force general who was the service's senior officer for intelligence.


Spies could leave behind sensors that could pick up sensitive communications, according to Deptula, who is now dean of the Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Power Studies.


Alaska hosts three large military bases — Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson in Anchorage, and Fort Wainwright and Eielson Air Force Base near Fairbanks — along with several smaller installations, reported Mr. Vanden Brook. Once regarded as a backwater in the military, Alaska has seen the Pentagon increasingly funnel resources and troops to the state in recent years as competition in the Arctic heats up. The state is also seen as key to homeland defense given its proximity to Russia, the ballistic missile threat from North Korea and, increasingly, China.


The Air Force has based its top fighter jets, F-22s and F-35s, in Alaska. The Army's Fort Greely, near Fairbanks, has sophisticated radars and missiles poised to defend against nuclear attack. Last year, the Army activated the 11th Airborne Division in Alaska as arctic warfare specialists. There are about 12,000 soldiers and 10,000 active-duty Air Force personnel stationed in Alaska.


USA Today reported Alaska's vast wilderness affords the Pentagon the opportunity to conduct major military exercises over land and at sea. Thousands of troops and more than 150 warplanes from the United States, United Kingdom and Australia warplanes took part in the recent Northern Edge war game. The annual exercise helps troops train against global superpowers, of whom, the United States has two: Russia and China.


Today’s Communist Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) is a highly motivated, politically committed force that aspires to peer status with the United States and is training to achieve that goal.


Extreme physical toughness and ideological commitment are hallmarks of the PLA’s elite units, such as their SOFs. Hiking the Darien Gap through Central America and dispersing to predetermined rally points to await instructions, or penetrating the Alaskan wilderness, would be a weekend ruck for a PLA Special Operations Unit… or 42 100-man units.


As Sam Faddis observed, hundreds of fighting-age Chinese males are entering the country daily. We have no idea who they are or what they intend, and apparently, no one in the Biden administration intends to find out.


The Capitol Switchboard is (202-224-3121), call today and tell your Senators and Representative that you demand the Biden administration end the “catch and release” of Red Chinese citizens entering the United States illegally, and that they be detained for investigation to document their education, military service, and ties to the Communist Chinese intelligence services.


George Rasley is editor of Richard Viguerie's ConservativeHQ.com and is a veteran of over 300 political campaigns. A member of American MENSA, he served on the staff of Vice President Dan Quayle, as Director of Policy and Communication for former Congressman Adam Putnam (FL-12) then Vice Chairman of the Oversight and Government Reform Committee's Subcommittee on National Security and Foreign Affairs, and as spokesman for retired Rep. Mac Thornberry, a member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and former Chairman of the House Armed Services Committee.



  • Chinese Communist Party (CCP)

  • Committee on the Present Danger: China

  • Biden administration

  • national security

  • Green channel

  • Chinese Communist Party

  • Confucius Institutes

  • Chinese Students and Scholars Association

  • Michael Yon

  • unrestricted warfare

  • Fulan Gong

  • Special Operations Forces (SOFs)

  • Zhao Qianli

  • People’s Liberation Army

  • Alaska military bases

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