Former Mayors Pete Buttigieg and Michael Bloomberg may have a point about Socialist Senator Bernie Sanders' lack of appeal to suburban middle-income voters. But here’s the problem – all the Democratic candidates are with Bernie or even to the Left of him on issue after issue.

Only very strict quarantine and safeguards can stop the spread of the coronavirus. We think if Democrats really care about protecting their fellow citizens from a coronavirus COVID-19 epidemic, then they will cooperate with the President and Secretary Azar in immediately closing our borders and funding an expansion of the research necessary to contain the disease. If they don’t then we all will know they are just playing politics with American lives.

South Carolinians vote on Saturday and then on Super Tuesday, March 3, 1,617 total delegates will be awarded in 14 state primaries. Democrat voters will determine the winners and losers of party debates, and if the past is any indication, Bernie Sanders offers the most of what they like to see. Is America watching?

American Ingrate: Ilhan Omar and the Progressive-Islamist Takeover of the Democratic Party is a brave and much-need look at the rise of Muslim Democrat Representative Ilhan Omar (MN-5), the master manipulator who has made herself the face of the new Democratic Party. It is also the story of modern America, a country too paralyzed by political correctness to examine closely the neon signs of fraud and deceit in the rise of this radical media darling.

However troubled its military, India holds an obvious strategic appeal to the United States by virtue of both its location and its size. India will soon become the world’s most populous country, on track to surpass China by 2027. It shares a long border with southern and western China and controls important territorial waters Beijing needs for its maritime trade routes.

As the Democrat presidential race moves towards the South Carolina primary and Super Tuesday on March 3, the non-Bernie Sanders candidates recognize they’re in a tight spot. Time is running out to alter the course of the contest, so expect another bash-on-Bernie fest in the Palmetto State debate tonight.

CHQ Exclusives

Former Mayors Pete Buttigieg and Michael Bloomberg may have a point about Socialist Senator Bernie Sanders' lack of appeal to suburban middle-income voters. But here’s the problem – all the Democratic candidates are with Bernie or even to the Left of him on issue after issue.

Only very strict quarantine and safeguards can stop the spread of the coronavirus. We think if Democrats really care about protecting their fellow citizens from a coronavirus COVID-19 epidemic, then they will cooperate with the President and Secretary Azar in immediately closing our borders and funding an expansion of the research necessary to contain the disease. If they don’t then we all will know they are just playing politics with American lives.

South Carolinians vote on Saturday and then on Super Tuesday, March 3, 1,617 total delegates will be awarded in 14 state primaries. Democrat voters will determine the winners and losers of party debates, and if the past is any indication, Bernie Sanders offers the most of what they like to see. Is America watching?

American Ingrate: Ilhan Omar and the Progressive-Islamist Takeover of the Democratic Party is a brave and much-need look at the rise of Muslim Democrat Representative Ilhan Omar (MN-5), the master manipulator who has made herself the face of the new Democratic Party. It is also the story of modern America, a country too paralyzed by political correctness to examine closely the neon signs of fraud and deceit in the rise of this radical media darling.

However troubled its military, India holds an obvious strategic appeal to the United States by virtue of both its location and its size. India will soon become the world’s most populous country, on track to surpass China by 2027. It shares a long border with southern and western China and controls important territorial waters Beijing needs for its maritime trade routes.

As the Democrat presidential race moves towards the South Carolina primary and Super Tuesday on March 3, the non-Bernie Sanders candidates recognize they’re in a tight spot. Time is running out to alter the course of the contest, so expect another bash-on-Bernie fest in the Palmetto State debate tonight.

Many conservatives have been chortling with glee at the prospect of Socialist Senator Bernie Sanders getting the Democratic Party’s nomination for President. The assumption seems to be that a Bernie nomination will make the 2020 campaign a pushover for Donald Trump’s reelection. Our take is that in the aftermath of Bernie’s victory in the Nevada Caucuses, we conservatives should be careful what we wish for.

Our friend Phil Haney died last Friday under mysterious circumstances. Mr. Haney was the author of the must-read book See Something, Say Nothing which documented the Obama Administration’s efforts to obfuscate the role Islam played in the numerous Muslim terrorist attacks that took place in America from 2008 to 2016.

The beneficiary of the Democrats’ nomination struggle is President Trump himself. It doesn’t take a genius to see Trump is drawing strength from the Democrats’ unfortunate situation and the coming months should be truly entertaining – and revealing. Pass the popcorn and soda; this is better than a matinee at the movie house.

We have been listening very attentively to what the Democrats have been saying during their debates and campaign appearances, and all their statements and speeches always seem to boil down to one thing: They plan to make you do things you don’t want to do.

Serious and credible questions about the government’s motives and conduct of the investigation and prosecution of Roger Stone, including seating a tainted jury, have been raised. We believe a sentence of 40 months in prison is manifstly unfair and urge President Trump to step in and immediately exercise his pardon power to right the wrongs perpetrated against Roger Stone.

There’s little doubt President Trump’s appearance at the Great American Race last Sunday turned heads and raised eyebrows among the Democrats and his #NeverTrump critics. Anti-Trumpers look on helplessly while Trump gathers momentum for the fall campaign, just like “The Beast” circled the track at Daytona.

Front Page Headlines

  • Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

    Sanders represents “Medicare for All.” Abolition of private health insurance. War on Wall Street. The Green New Deal. Free college tuition. Forgiveness of all student debt. Open borders. Supreme Court justices committed to Roe v. Wade. Welfare for undocumented migrants. A doubling of the minimum wage to $15 an hour. Winston Churchill once observed: “Some regard private enterprise as if it were a predatory tiger to be shot. Others look upon it as a cow that they can milk. Only a handful see it for what it really is — the strong horse that pulls the whole cart.” Sanders sees free market capitalism as a fat goose that lays golden eggs and can be hectored, squeezed and beaten into producing lots more.

  • Byron York, Washington Examiner

    Recently, the Intelligence Community made clear it will be a player in the 2020 presidential election. No one should be surprised. On Feb. 13, the House Intelligence Committee held a meeting at which intelligence officials briefed lawmakers on foreign efforts to influence U.S. elections. By several accounts, the officials told the committee that Russia is working to reelect President Trump. Later, just to make matters more difficult, there were leaks that Russia is also trying to help elect Bernie Sanders. The leak left many experts baffled, except to the extent that, with the Trump leak, it seemed to target the Intelligence Community's two least-favorite candidates. Trump was angry after the news broke.

  • Robert Stacy McCain, The American Spectator

    It’s important to recognize the huge potential downside of a Sanders candidacy. As Glenn Reynolds said, “You can assume that Trump would crush Bernie, and you’re probably right. But any major-party nominee, however lame, has a nonzero chance of becoming President, and that’s bad when we’re talking about a commie.” The possibility that Sanders could actually win the White House may seem far-fetched, but we can’t forget that all the experts thought Trump could never win four years ago. America is a deeply divided country, and watching an avowed socialist score primary victories should inspire concern. Even if all Bernie does is lead Democrats to defeat, the omens for our nation’s future are disturbing.

  • David Harsanyi, National Review

    There’s little doubt that Bernie believes collectivism — the discarding of property rights, for starters — offers a more equitable and decent option than capitalism. Bernie’s career has never been propelled by policy, most of them untenable here, but rather by class warfare. And younger voters are, and often have been, more susceptible to the “ethics” of socialism. At this point in history, they’ve not seen the economic infeasibility of those ideas, many of the massive disasters spawned by them, or the coercion that’s inevitably required to make them “work.” Or, maybe they don’t care. No, Bernie isn't Stalin, but he is a socialist. He’s been a lifelong defender of authoritarians. We're debating his positions.

  • Charles Hurt, Washington Times

    You have heard how China is the “sick man” of the world? Well, Mr. Sanders is the “sick man” of the Democrat Party. Everybody is scrambling to get away from him. After three years of lectures about Russian meddling in U.S. elections and how President Trump is a Kremlin puppet, the Democrats’ solution is — literally to turn control of America over to a socialist who oozes sympathy and admiration for communist dictators who kill people the world over. Mr. Bloomberg needs to grow up, channel his inner adulthood, stick to zingers like and forget all the pandering about "stop and frisk". It’s all so childish, Mini Mike. Don’t be scared. Be a man. Stand tall. Or, at least, as “tall” as you can.

  • Stephen Moore, CNS News

    It's time to get smart about energy and climate change and throw asunder taxpayer subsidies doled out to all forms of energy production. Let the market, not politicians and environmental groups, choose the safest, cheapest and most reliable energy source. Everyone is making a big bet on battery-operated cars and trucks. But who's to say that trucks and buses fueled by natural gas won't be the wave of the future? No one knows what makes the most sense or where the future will lead us. Markets are shouting out for natural gas on a grander scale. Fifteen years ago, no one would have thought we would have a superabundance of this wonder-fuel today. But we do. No one is more surprised than politicians. Why do we let them keep betting the farm on the wrong horse?

  • David Catron, The American Spectator

    Bernie Sanders' "army" of young voters won’t be there in the general election — they may not even know when or how to vote — unless they are the focus of a well-led, well-financed, technologically-savvy campaign operation unencumbered by internecine party warfare. In the 2020 election cycle only the Trump reelection campaign and the Republican National Committee come close to fitting that description. They have nearly unanimous GOP support and are signing up new recruits every day from the ranks of the very people the Democrats abandoned after 2008. While the Democrats squabble among themselves and slander the President, he is situating himself to win the electoral college and the popular vote in 2020.

  • John Fund, National Review

    The problem that establishment Democrats face in making the argument that Sanders would lose to Trump is simple. Bernie’s base of supporters simply can’t bring themselves to accept that their guy’s positions on issues could be less popular than those of Trump The Fascist. A lot of Americans think that Bernie Sanders has a personality problem, too. He comes across as an irritable, red-faced scold, waving his arms while he calls for revolution, sort of the crazy uncle of American politics. I welcome a matchup between Sanders and Trump because the campaign would be fought over an important issue: Should America move rapidly toward socialism? Perhaps the country would render a useful and definitive answer.

  • Editors, Washington Examiner

    After Nevada, Democrats are now one step closer to having an avowed socialist at the top of their ticket. At a time when unemployment is at a 50-year low, they’ll be running against a capitalist system that is responsible for spreading more freedom, ending more hunger, and lifting more people out of poverty than any other system in world history. If the time is ripe for Sanders’s socialist revolution, most American voters don’t know it yet. So great are the blessings of capitalism that it enabled Sanders (through writing a book) to join the ranks of the top 1% by having established himself as the country’s most famous socialist. Yet now, he wants to become president so he can tear that system down.

  • Kurt Schlichter, Townhall

    There is still establishment trash in key positions, and the president is taking out the garbage. He is cleaning house of losers, schemers, hacks, and pompous fat-bodies. He’s going to ruthlessly purge the national security/foreign policy bureaucracy, getting rid of the Never Trump weasels and replacing them with actual patriots. The media is going nuts, as it has been directed to do by its masters, screeching that Trump is ruining the institutions that have not failed to fail at everything they have done in nearly 30 years. He’s going to try out a new idea on our bureaucracy – having it not suck at its job. The reason you are hearing all the shrieking and screaming is that it’s working.

  • Roger L. Simon, The Epoch Times

    The craps analogy weirdly applies to all the roughly 250 caucuses taking place across Nevada because the system really is a “crap shoot” in the true sense of that hoary phrase, mixed in with a little poker. Call it “jacks to open, trips to win.” Don’t believe me? If it’s a tie between two candidates at one of the precincts, a mint deck of cards is unwrapped (just like at the 21 table), cut a minimum of seven times and then drawn by representatives of the candidates. Aces are high, in case you’re interested, and, in the event of a tie, spades win, clubs lose. Does this sound like democracy? Not to me. But at least the Nevadans, unlike the Iowans, have early voting, assuming the iPads work.

  • Tim Graham, CNS News

    Washington journalists are rejoicing that celebrity glitz and glamour are returning with their self-celebrating soiree, the White House correspondents' dinner. Last time around, Hasan Minhaj worried out loud saying that in the Trump era, "trust is more important than truth." And many people don't trust the press, which he equates with truth, just like The New York Times does. These highly educated, well-read policy nerds somehow can't imagine that a comedy routine like this mixed in with candid shots of Wolf Blitzer or Brian Stelter guffawing along isn't helping the idea that the press is nonpartisan, that it doesn't see itself as valiantly taking a side. They're urged to keep their "foot on the gas".

  • Robert Stacy McCain, The American Spectator

    Having lost any ability to influence Republicans, the Never Trump crowd has now begun offering advice to Democrats, and it’s tempting to hope Democrats will listen to these “experts.” More than eight months remain until Election Day, and a lot can happen in that time. The most likely outcome, by historical standards, is that Trump will be reelected. His administration has been successful in many ways, particularly in terms of economics. Unless there’s another 2008-sized financial collapse between now and Election Day, Trump’s economic record is a powerful argument for a second term. We don’t know what we don’t know, and the political “experts” really don’t know much more than the rest of us.

  • Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

    Bloomberg’s campaign is sounding the alarm that Sanders could soon amass an insurmountable delegate lead if the Democratic field stays split, and is urging the other candidates to drop out. Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar, and Joe Biden are being told that if they do not get out of the race and clear the lane for the mayor, they will get a socialist as their nominee, and the party will deserve the fate November will bring—a second term for Trump. As the other candidates cannot beat Sanders, Bloomberg’s campaign is saying, they should step aside and clear the field for Mayor Mike. This would call for a spirit of self-sacrifice and measure of esteem for the mayor not evident on that stage Wednesday night.

  • David Keene, Washington Times

    Today’s Republicans are if not joyful at least capable of joking about themselves, their adversaries and the world around them. Even President Trump’s most ardent supporters often find themselves laughing at what the man has to say, and attend his rallies not because they are attracted to hour-and-half speeches but because the rallies are entertaining and fun. If depressed Democrats want to go off by themselves to bemoan their political fate or the failure of others to see the wisdom of their nostrums, fine. Perhaps we should feel sorry for them, but acknowledge their right to wallow in their own misery. But they aren’t content. Instead, they want to make sure that everyone else is just as miserable.